F3 Farmhouse / DADA & Partners

first_imgPhotographs:  Ranjan Sharma / Lightzone India Save this picture!© Ranjan Sharma / Lightzone IndiaRecommended ProductsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEADoorsJansenDoors – Folding and SlidingLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsDoorsECLISSESliding Pocket Door – ECLISSE LuceText description provided by the architects. Designed as a lifestyle home the program was deliberately split into two units centered around a large central court. The larger of these two units holds the formal and informal areas on the lower floor with the bedrooms on the upper level. The smaller “Outhouse Unit” serves as the entertainment den along with a gymnasium, sauna, changing rooms, and service areas. The outhouse faces the central court on the South side while the North is defined by a monolithic white compound wall-as found in older tropical estates- that encloses a private garden, which could be developed into a gridded orchard over time. Save this picture!© Ranjan Sharma / Lightzone IndiaThe West façade facing the entry drop-off court is, has been deliberately designed as a heavy composition with minimal fenestrations so as to minimize unwanted heat gains. A narrow opening between the main building and the outhouse provides an initial glimpse into the slightly raised central court and the large lawn at the rear of the property.  The courtyard with its swimming pool and barbeque court faces the bar and living room. Save this picture!© Ranjan Sharma / Lightzone IndiaThe courtyard is organized around a sunken barbeque court and a swimming pool that terminates with an infinity edge along its eastern face. The formal sitting and informal family room wrap this programmed space in a “L” formation.  On the first floor, a taller cubic volume clad in seasoned hardwood, is placed along the long axis of the linear pool. A 15’ tall window seems to bring in the court and the landscape green into this bedroom. Save this picture!Site PlanProject gallerySee allShow lessNelson Cultural Center / HGASelected ProjectsHelsinki Central Library Competition Entry / STL ArchitectsArticles Share Area:  14000 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  CopyAbout this officeDADA & PartnersOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesWoodResidentialNew DelhiHousesIndiaPublished on December 14, 2012Cite: “F3 Farmhouse / DADA & Partners” 14 Dec 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogLouvers / ShuttersTechnowoodSunshade SystemsRailing / BalustradesMitrexIntegrated Photovoltaic Railing – BIPV RailingMetal PanelsAurubisCopper Alloy: Nordic BrassWindowsVitrocsaMinimalist Window – GuillotineGlassLAMILUXGlass Roof PR60 PassivhausSinksBradley Corporation USASinks – Verge LVG-SeriesSealantsSikaConstruction Solutions in Stavros FoundationShower TraysAcquabellaShower Tray – Focus BetonPatios / TerracesFranken-SchotterPatios and TerracesCeramicsTerrealTerracotta cladding in Le TrèfleSkylightsFAKROWooden pivot roof windows FYP-V proSkySynthetics / AsphaltFirestone Building ProductsRoofing System – RubberGard EPDMMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream F3 Farmhouse / DADA & Partners F3 Farmhouse / DADA & PartnersSave this projectSaveF3 Farmhouse / DADA & Partners “COPY” Photographs “COPY” 2011 India Projects Houses ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/306132/f3-farmhouse-dada-partners Clipboard ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/306132/f3-farmhouse-dada-partners Clipboard ArchDaily Architects: DADA & Partners Area Area of this architecture project CopyHouses•New Delhi, India Save this picture!© Ranjan Sharma / Lightzone India+ 25 Sharelast_img read more

Betsson AB appoints ‘Strategy Pro’ Peter Frey as group Product/Tech lead

first_img Submit Share StumbleUpon Betsson outrides pandemic challenges as regulatory dramas loom July 21, 2020 Peter Frey – Betsson ABMerging the executive positions of Chief Product and Technical Officer, Stockholm-listed online gambling group Betsson AB has confirmed the appointment of Peter Frey to its corporate leadership team.A seasoned technology and digital strategy expert, Frey joins Betsson’s executive team from Bonnier Group, Scandinavia’s largest media publishing group, where he most recently served as Chief Technical Officer (2016-2018).Confirming the appointment of Frey as combined ‘CPO & CTO’, Betsson governance highlights the executive’s extensive track-record in delivering successful projects, noting his success at transforming Swedish newspaper – Aftonbladet into Sweden’s most visited website.Frey who is set to join the Stockholm enterprise within the coming months will be a key stakeholder in Betsson’s ongoing transformation programme, executed in 2018 by Betsson Chief Executive & Chairman Pontus Lindwall.In its update, Betsson confirms that Frey will work closely with new Chief Commercial Officer Ronni Hartvig on undertaking ‘business prioritisations’ as well as gaining a strategy and operations overview.Updating the market,  Jesper Svensson, CEO of Betsson Operations said, “Throughout his career, Peter has shown that he can deliver highly user-centric products and is, therefore, a perfect match for Betsson. With fewer layers in the organisation we know we can be more efficient, as we did with the successful merger of Marketing and Commercial a while back. At the end of the day, it’s all about efficient delivery of business driven initiatives. Holding the combined CPO/CTO role, Peter Frey will be able to balance capacity changes and ensure swift delivery of improvements to our customer experience.” Related Articles Share Andy McCue returns to betting with Betsson AB June 22, 2020 GiG lauds its ‘B2B makeover’ delivering Q2 growth August 11, 2020last_img read more

Make Your Messages Stick – With Made to Stick

first_imgSource: http://www.gettingattention.org/my_weblog/2007/01/make_your_messa.htmlAbout the AuthorNancy E. Schwartz helps nonprofits succeed through effective marketing and communications. As President of Nancy Schwartz & Company (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/), Nancy and her team provide marketing planning and implementation services to organizations as varied as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Center for Asian American Media, and Wake County (NC) Health Services.Subscribe to her free e-newsletter “Getting Attention”, (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/getting_attention.html) and read her blog at http://www.gettingattention.org/ for more insights, ideas and great tips on attracting the attention your organization deserves.NOTE: You’re welcome to “reprint” this article online as long as it remains complete and unaltered (including the copyright and “about the author” info at the end), and you send a copy of your reprint. When I read Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point, I quickly became a convert. I learned to watch for, and value, stickiness. But it was harder to understand how to make my nonprofit client’s ideas and messages stick.Now, brothers Chip and Dan Heath, fill in the blanks with their guide, Made to Stick. For the Heaths, stickiness is all about “ensuring your ideas are understood and remembered, and have a lasting impact – they change your audience’s opinions or behavior“.Dan, a consultant at Duke, and his brother Chip, a professor at Stanford Business School, found that messages of all kinds — from the infamous “organ theft ring” hoax and a coach’s lessons on sportsmanship to a product vision statement from Sony — draw their power from the same six principles of stickiness:Simple — Hone in on the essence of your subject, stripping out the extra. Think core and compact, like a proverb.Unexpected — Break a pattern or routine to get attention. Use unexpected stories, language, channels. Highlight a gap in knowledge. Create mystery with a teaser.Concrete — Abstraction is hard to digest, and to retain. Explain your idea or message in concrete terms to help people understand (with less room for interpretation) and remember.Credible — Help audiences believe. Cite authorities, details and statistics.Emotional — Make people care. Appeal to self-interest. Introduce audiences to others they can relate to, link your messages to what they already care about and their aspirations. The Times Neediest Cases Fund excels here, crafting compelling profiles supported by photos to generate a great deal of empathy, interest and donations among Times readers. I’ve been reading those profiles since I was a kid, and giving every year.Story(telling) — A story brings ideas to life, placing them in a lifelike framework we can relate to, and remember. The Neediest Cases Fund excels at telling powerful stories. Stories are frequently unexpected, concrete, emotional and credible. The best ones are simple enough to be remembered and re-told.Download Made to Stick for Social Enterprise for a printable guide on these six sticky elements: Beware the Curse of Knowledge.Our knowledge is often a barrier to clear messages, because we can’t imagine (and sometimes don’t try) the perspective of someone who doesn’t know it. The more we know about a subject, the less we’re able to shape it into a message that will stick, but the Heaths offer strategies for defeating the Curse of Knowledge and other roadblocks to sticky success.Made to Stick is the rare business book that’s well-written and absolutely entertaining. And Chip and Dan walk the walk, building their book on a foundation of compelling anecdotes and stories. Made to Stick is a must read for anyone striving to craft messages that are memorable and lasting.last_img read more

Media Habits of 12-24 Year-Olds vs. 25-54 Year-Olds — Key to Shaping Your Nonprofit Marketing Agenda

first_imgCare GREATLY about sources of news and information onlineNurture your brand — it’s vital for these folks Like mobile for voice (and a few for data) but do not see their world on mobile phonesI think this is going to change very soon, pay close attention to this factor Source: http://www.gettingattention.org/my_weblog/2007/10/media-habits-of.htmlAbout the AuthorNancy E. Schwartz helps nonprofits succeed through effective marketing and communications. As President of Nancy Schwartz & Company (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/), Nancy and her team provide marketing planning and implementation services to organizations as varied as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Center for Asian American Media, and Wake County (NC) Health Services.Subscribe to her free e-newsletter “Getting Attention”, (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/getting_attention.html) and read her blog at http://www.gettingattention.org/ for more insights, ideas and great tips on attracting the attention your organization deserves.NOTE: You’re welcome to “reprint” this article online as long as it remains complete and unaltered (including the copyright and “about the author” info at the end), and you send a copy of your reprint. For first time willing (2005) to pay for digital content-never beforeInventory your information assets and think about options for distribution Will never own a land-line phoneWill not watch television on someone else’s schedule much longer, and much less interested in TVTV ads won’t work, unless they’re part of the show (how about cause placement?) Use IM. Think email is for their parentsLife of a 25-54Still read offline newspapers and magazinesCast your op-eds to this group, boomers and seniors Little interest in the source of information and most information aggregatedEverything will move to mobileMore than advocacy and fundraising alerts, and make it interactive please Aggregate information online and use RSS (though few know the term)Community important for tasks, much less so for socializingTrust experts on factual information but rely heavily on reviews of peers on hotels, electronics, etcStart to use social networking with these folks, they’re on the path of increased reliance on audience-generated content I recently read the 2007 Digital Future Report from the USC Annenberg School’s Center for the Digital Future, and am still digesting. Take some time to dig into the summary of findings that’ll help you shape your communications choices to today’s (and tomorrow’s) digital habits.Here’s are some crucial takes on habits of those 12 to 24–juxtaposed with those of audiences 25 to 54–and how they’ll impact your nonprofit marketing:Audiences 12-24Will never read a newspaper but attracted to some magazinesSo op-eds don’t reach them, at least in print Heavy into email Trust unknown peers more than experts/community at the center of Internet experience/want to be heard (user generated)Stop ignoring social networkinglast_img read more

RE3.org – Using Social Media for Social Marketing Success

first_imgLet me introduce you to RE3.org, a North Carolina campaign to raise awareness about waste reduction and recycling. Launched in 2005, the RE3.org campaign targets high schoolers, college students and twenty-somethings via compelling social marketing strategies.Pay close attention, readers, to the thorough audience research campaign communicators implemented — working closely with collegiate recycling coordinators throughout the state to identify barriers to recycling perceived by twenty-somethings, and how they get their information and influences. Based on this research, the campaign has focused on social marketing techniques such as commitment, norms, incentives and prompts. Here’s how the RE3.org folks describe their social marketing strategy.Initially, the campaign used more traditional marketing channels, such as a Web site (yes, the Web can now be considered traditional), ads on cable, pre-movie ads, billboards, trucks and Mountain Dew cans (a favorite drink of the target audience).This year, the campaign has grown to incorporate some powerful social media techniques including:A BLOG! — Yes, the first time I’ve seen a social marketing campaign so effectively integrate a blog into its communications. Nice work. This blog is up-to-date (with posts three to five times/weekly), chatty, fun, interesting, and productive (used also as an informal idea motivator/workspace for RE3.org staff and supporters).Online WOM (word of mouth) marketing via YouTube (lots of catchy videos motivating recycling) and MySpace (sample Grandaddy Nature Anthem, it’s funny and memorable).Nice work, RE3.org. I know that much of its success comes from being so closely in touch with target audiences. It’s the only way to understand the needs, interests and habits of those you’re trying to reach.Source: http://www.gettingattention.org/my_weblog/2007/07/re3org-case-stu.htmlAbout the AuthorNancy E. Schwartz helps nonprofits succeed through effective marketing and communications. As President of Nancy Schwartz & Company (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/), Nancy and her team provide marketing planning and implementation services to organizations as varied as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Center for Asian American Media, and Wake County (NC) Health Services.Subscribe to her free e-newsletter “Getting Attention”, (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/getting_attention.html) and read her blog at http://www.gettingattention.org/ for more insights, ideas and great tips on attracting the attention your organization deserves.NOTE: You’re welcome to “reprint” this article online as long as it remains complete and unaltered (including the copyright and “about the author” info at the end), and you send a copy of your reprint.last_img read more

The Make A Wish Foundation Attracts Donors with First National Campaign

first_imgThe Make A Wish Foundation of America launched its first national fundraising campaign several months ago and the results were better than it could have hoped for.There are more than 60 Make A Wish chapters across the country and each typically sponsors its own efforts to find volunteers, raise money and encourage people to donate needed resources, such as air miles. The organization uses more than three billion miles a year fulfilling the wishes of children with life-threatening illnesses.Big-name sponsors like Disney, Frito-Lay, 3M and Amtrak soon started lining up to help with those efforts once word started getting out that Make A Wish was conducting a national campaign.“[After 27 years, the Make A Wish foundation] wanted to provide our chapters with a vehicle to unify their efforts and something that sponsors could get behind,” said Mike Pressendo, director of brand communications at Make A Wish Foundation, about the national campaign.The central theme of the campaign, which launched in June, was that everyone, not just celebrities, has the power to grant a sick child’s wish. The Kaplan Thaler Group, known for its work with Aflac, donated all the creative.Donated advertising space enabled the Make A Wish foundation, Phoenix, AZ, to put its message on the side of buses in several cities, on the televisions inside elevators in buildings around the country and even on Niagara Fall’s Maid of the Mist. As a result, the organization generated 1.3 billion media impressions in just 30 days. Last year, it took the Make A Wish foundation 12 months to generate over 1 billion media impressions.However, even before Make A Wish launched the campaign, the organization made a similarly significant step by preparing its Web site for the anticipated increase in activity.“We realized that before we start drumming up a lot of public interest in helping Make A Wish, we needed to think about what we can do to capture that interest,” Pressendo said.With this in mind, the foundation and Digital Pulp Inc., its interactive agency, launched a new section on the Make A Wish Web site at http://www.wish.org./ Called “Ways to Help,” it serves as a centralizing hub for people who are interested in helping out. Disney is the sponsor of the new section.“Overall, Make A Wish is better leveraging the Web for communicating, finding volunteers and bringing in donations,” said Gene Lewis, partner and director of Web development at Digital Pulp Inc., New York.Previously, the Make A Wish Web site directed people who wanted to volunteer to their local chapters. After putting the application for volunteering up on the site earlier this year, however, Make A Wish received more than 9,000 offers within the first 30 days. Its four-year goal for the national campaign is to sign up 20,000 volunteers.The new section also makes it easier for individual chapters to post their needs – which might include a formal dress or prepaid calling cards. Now, people can type in their ZIP code and find out what the needs are of the chapter in their area.In other areas, the Web site’s shopping element has been integrated into the section and shopping at participating retailers is better identified as one of the ways to help out. The section for donating frequent flyer miles is now showcased more prominently than before, as this is such an important need for the organization.A new addition to the site, which appears in the Ways to Help Out section, is the Adopt-A-Wish program, which allows donors to fund a single wish experience in its entirety.The next step for the Make-A-Wish foundation will be to continue to use the Web to better connect the chapters with the national office by giving each independent office the opportunity to leverage technology made available by the head office, and create a regional Web site that is more seamlessly integrated with the national one.The chapters will be able to pick from a number of different templates that are brand-compliant for their own Web sites. They’ll also be able to include a link on their own Web sites to a promotion that a national donor is sponsoring.From DMNews.comSource: http://nonprofitpr.com/2007/09/12/the-make-a-wish-foundation-attracts-donors-with-first-national-campaign.aspxlast_img read more

Putting One Person’s Story to Work for Your Nonprofit

first_imgI once received an email from Michael Moore, updating me on his recent Oprah appearance. The segment — Sicko: It Could Happen to You — put what “neuromarketer” Roger Dooley calls the “power of personalization” to work to engage the mass of Oprah’s viewers.More precisely, I’d call it the power of one. According to Dooley, the story of one person is far more compelling than an appeal for a group of people whose plight remains far more abstract.Logic tells us that a bigger problem should get more attention. One person suffering from a disease is certainly bad, but a thousand afflicted individuals should motivate us far more. But it doesn’t work that way,…research shows that our brains operate in an illogical and perhaps unexpected manner.Paul Slovic, a researcher at Decision Research, has demonstrating this by measuring the contribution levels from people shown pictures of starving children. Some subjects were shown a photo of a single starving child from Mali, others were shown a photo of eight children. But subjects shown a group of eight starving children contributed 50% less money than those shown just one.Clearly, non-profit marketers need to make their marketing efforts as personal as possible – and not just on the donor side, but on the recipient side as well. This is real “one-to-one” marketing.Our brains are wired to respond more strongly to an individual plight than the same condition afflicting a group.The “one” in that show was actually a couple of people fighting hard for health coverage: Former steelworker Stephen Skvara, and Civia Katz, who saw Sicko and sent her story of denied coverage for a vital, but not life-threatening fibroid removal surgery to Moore. Skvara, who retired on disability after 34 years, received a standing ovation during the presidential debate in Chicago last month when he told the Democratic presidential hopefuls that he can’t afford to pay for his wife’s health insurance since his former employer went bankrupt. His words and image (Svara walks with two canes) resonated hugely, and he’s become a symbol of all that’s wrong with our health care system.Nonprofit marketers can learn a lot from Moore, and from Oprah. Remember that personalization works two ways — slugging your prospective donor/program participant/volunteer’s name into an email or letter; and personalizing the recipients of the donations or volunteer work. When you do, your audiences will get a real sense of the difference their gift or participation makes in a fellow human’s life.Source: http://www.gettingattention.org/my_weblog/2007/09/the-power-of-on.htmlAbout the AuthorNancy E. Schwartz helps nonprofits succeed through effective marketing and communications. As President of Nancy Schwartz & Company (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/), Nancy and her team provide marketing planning and implementation services to organizations as varied as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Center for Asian American Media, and Wake County (NC) Health Services.Subscribe to her free e-newsletter “Getting Attention”, (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/getting_attention.html) and read her blog at http://www.gettingattention.org/ for more insights, ideas and great tips on attracting the attention your organization deserves.NOTE: You’re welcome to “reprint” this article online as long as it remains complete and unaltered (including the copyright and “about the author” info at the end), and you send a copy of your reprint.last_img read more

What is Twitter and What Can a Nonprofit Do With It?

first_imgI realize that many people in nonprofits may answer that question with “I don’t use Twitter.”  I’m not saying everyone should.  But for those who have adopted it or are thinking about it, the next step is to find a style of use and how to integrate it into your work flow.What It Is:Twitter is a microblogging tool that allows users to post short updatesYou follow your friends and groups you’re interested inYou can get your messages via IM, mobile text, or the webTwitter changes some expectations associated with online communications – you are limited to 140 characters per updateHow It Might Be Used:Social while at a conference to find better sessions or partiesUsing Twitter as a virtual water cooler.Industry gossipShare resources or blog postsDrive traffic web page/blog or commentsAsk a question, get an answerGet referralsAd hoc collaborationsSending reports in an emergencyGetting newsProduct recommendations while in a storeSolicitation tool for a fundraising campaign“That’s the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard of it.”  That’s what my husband said the other night when I showed him Twitter.  He also added, there’s more effective ways to spend your time.   Then, he went through the Twitter Life CycleThe next question is something like, “What’s an effective way to use it?”Stay hyper connected or take a break?Dip in or submerge?Trend Tracking:You can now track concepts on Twitter via your cell phone. You can track keywords like “Nonprofit” or you can ego track “Beth Kanter.” Jermiah Owyang suggests “This could provide more utility for those that are responsible for watching certain markets, products, or even emergency use.”  Sources: http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2007/10/dip-in-or-subme.html and http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2007/10/trend-tacking-w.htmllast_img read more

Why Nonprofits Need Strong Taglines

first_imgYour Nonprofit’s Name Alone Isn’t EnoughYou’ve got to explain in a few words what your nonprofit does, and why it’s valuable. That’s the job of the tagline.Many organizations expect their names to broadcast what it is they do. Trouble is-it just doesn’t happen that way very often. One reason why is that many nonprofit names are indistinguishable from each other. Another is that audiences frequently confuse the work of organizations focused on the same issues – think Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International.Where Your Tagline Fits InThe tagline is one of the four vital components of your branding portfolio, along with your nonprofit’s logo, overall graphic look and feel, and positioning statement.Remember that the tagline should be such a natural outgrowth of your organization’s positioning statement (the one or two sentences you’d use to reply to someone asking what the organization does) so that the two are inextricably linked. A great tagline differentiates you from your competitors while expressing your organization’s personality and adding consistency to your marketing and communications.The bonus? Your tagline will help to align internal understanding of your organization’s direction and goals.But beware; the absence of a tagline – or the use of an ineffective one – will put your nonprofit at a competitive disadvantage in funding, building your staff and volunteer base, and increasing use of your programs and products.Some Great Nonprofit ExamplesHere are a couple of high-impact nonprofit taglines:“Change Your Life for Good”– City University of New YorkThis tagline promises that you’ll transform your life, and luck, through enrolling at CUNY. Who wouldn’t want to know more?“Finding the ways that work”– Environmental DefenseEnvironmental Defense’s name couldn’t be any clearer. So they crafted a tagline that conveys what’s unique about how they do it – innovation and persistence.“Helping families in need get better nutrition on a budget”– Share Our StrengthBingo! This tagline works so well because it’s clear, accessible, brief and specific. It shows what is unique about their approach to hunger and demonstrates a positive impact.Does your tagline (organizational or for a particular program) fit these criteria? If not, consider reworking it today. Few words have more power.Taglines that Don’t WorkYou can also learn a lot from taglines that fall flat:“Defending Human Rights Worldwide”– Human Rights WatchDon’t waste your tagline text repeating what’s in your name (figuratively or literally, as in this example). Unfortunately, this tagline tells us nothing more than the name does.Remember…your tagline is a terrible thing to waste.Six Keys to a Powerful TaglineExamine other organizations’ (especially your competitors’) taglines to see what makes them work. Then apply that learning to the creation of your tagline.Your tagline must be simple, concise, clear, understandable and convey your marketing message.Make sure your tagline can be understood by a multi-cultural or international audience, if you have one. Cultural differences are critical here.Include words or phrases that connect with your logo, if possible. Example: Own a piece of the rock for Prudential Insurance, which has a rock logo.Use active verbs. As always, they’ll engage your audiences.Hold your course. Once you create a tagline, stick with it. Don’t change it just because you’re tired of it. Some of the most well known taglines have been used for years. Sources: http://www.gettingattention.org/my_weblog/2007/04/clear_pithy_tag.html and http://www.nancyschwartz.com/nonprofit_tagline.htmlAbout the AuthorNancy E. Schwartz helps nonprofits succeed through effective marketing and communications. As President of Nancy Schwartz & Company (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/), Nancy and her team provide marketing planning and implementation services to organizations as varied as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Center for Asian American Media, and Wake County (NC) Health Services.Subscribe to her free e-newsletter “Getting Attention”, (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/getting_attention.html) and read her blog at http://www.gettingattention.org/ for more insights, ideas and great tips on attracting the attention your organization deserves.NOTE: You’re welcome to “reprint” this article online as long as it remains complete and unaltered (including the copyright and “about the author” info at the end), and you send a copy of your reprint.last_img read more