Codelco unions say nearly 3,000 miners infected by coronavirus, call for enhanced safety

first_imgTopics : Codelco did not immediately reply to requests for comment on the figure.Some unions and social groups have called on Codelco and other miners to halt operations around the mining hub of Calama, a desert city surrounded by some of Chile´s largest copper deposits.State-run Codelco, which turns over all its profits to government coffers, has largely maintained mine output despite shutting down its Chuquicamata smelter and slashing on-site staff by as much as 40%.Elgueta said calls for more safeguards will continue until the company prioritizes health and safety over production. Unions at Chile’s Codelco, the world’s largest copper producer, said on Wednesday that nearly 3,000 workers had been infected with the coronavirus, prompting renewed calls for more safety measures at the company’s sprawling operations.Patricio Elgueta, president of the Federation of Copper Workers (FTC), an umbrella group for the company’s unions, told Reuters it had tallied 2,843 coronavirus infections among workers as of July 5.”The company does not give the database to the workers, so we have to rebuild it every day in order to see how [infections] are progressing,” he said.center_img “They make it seem as though we want to shut down mining, but we only want to protect the lives and health of workers,” Elgueta said.The coronavirus outbreak has exploded across much of Chile´s mine-rich northern desert. The South American nation has recorded more than 300,000 cases and upward of 6,500 coronavirus-related deaths.Mining Minister Baldo Prokurica has pleaded with mining companies to protect the health of workers while maintaining output, a balance that had become increasingly difficult as infections spike in the mine-rich nation.last_img read more

The Kiwi’s Fleeting Flight

first_imgKiwi, which can be seen on YouTube right here, is one of the most popular videos of the last year, with more than 12 million views to date. Here’s a write-up of it:There are several powerful messages behind Kiwi, but mainly, it makes you think: no matter how absurd and seemingly out of reach your dreams are, what’s stopping you from achieving them?… Some people have described how Kiwi “sticks in your subconscious.” I know that whenever I feel sad, I’m going to close my eyes, visualize the thing that’s in my way or keeping me down, and tilt my head to the side to see the happy side of it.Sentimental, maybe even saccharine, but true. Limitations may not look like limitations if you shift your perspective and invest great effort. And, fortunately, this doesn’t always have to mean fleeting joy with a crashing end.last_img read more

Make it Easy for Online Readers to Spread the Word

first_imgCalvin College’s release on its Sushi Theatre is a great example. Note the prompt to Share the Story, and the easy-to-use links to do so. Also, as higher ed marketing guru Bob Johnson points out, “the topic of the press release, ‘Sushi Theatre’ is included in the title tag for the page, making it more likely that a search engine ‘spyders’ will find and index it. The keyword in the title tag is then repeated in the major text heading (the headline in this case) on the page, and again early in the text itself.”Source: http://www.gettingattention.org/my_weblog/2007/03/make_it_easy_fo.htmlAbout the AuthorNancy E. Schwartz helps nonprofits succeed through effective marketing and communications. As President of Nancy Schwartz & Company (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/), Nancy and her team provide marketing planning and implementation services to organizations as varied as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Center for Asian American Media, and Wake County (NC) Health Services.Subscribe to her free e-newsletter “Getting Attention”, (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/getting_attention.html) and read her blog at http://www.gettingattention.org/ for more insights, ideas and great tips on attracting the attention your organization deserves.NOTE: You’re welcome to “reprint” this article online as long as it remains complete and unaltered (including the copyright and “about the author” info at the end), and you send a copy of your reprint. Nothing’s more powerful than having your audiences spread the word about your program, organization or new leadership. Such “viral marketing” is far more powerful than your organization telling its own story as friends tend to listen to friends, and believe what they say. To encourage viral marketing, make it as easy as possible for your audiences to spread the word. Here are two great ways to do so:1. Include a ‘forward to a friend’ link in your e-news and advocacy campaigns.2. Enable your audiences to spread the word more broadly, via social networking tools. Here’s how:Crafted to double as direct communications with your target audiences. They have to be engaging, succinct and formatted for easy digestion (lots of bullets, white space and short paragraphs).Integrate key tools to link to spokesperson bio and contact info, related resources and more. They’ll make a world of difference.Feature the single keyword for the release in the page title tag, the primary content heading (in your list of releases, or in your site) and the text at the top of the release (ideally in the first sentence of the first paragraph).One-click buttons to Share the Story (more engaging than Forward to a Friend):Add the site to reader’s bookmarks via DeliciousRate the site via DIGG.last_img read more

Help! My Boss Hates Marketing!

first_img“Help! My boss hates marketing!” is one of the most common comments I get from people who speak to me after my presentations. Here are some quick answers to: “How do I get my boss/board/team to value/fund/stop hating marketing?”Simply stated, you don’t. Instead, you do the following six things.1. Stop calling it marketing. Call it something else.Instead of trying to convince your boss, board or team to love marketing, try showing them what THEY care about and how you can make that happen.2. Show how your “initiative” meets their agenda. Don’t position your agenda as a marketing campaign; frame it as your initiative to support your boss’s goals, in your boss’s language. Demonstrate how you are going to help make that fundraising goal, audience behavior change or front-page newspaper story happen.3. Make it about the audience.A good way to depersonalize different visions for “marketing” is to make it about your audience’s preferences rather than a philosophical tug of war between you and said boss. A little audience research is great fodder for advancing your agenda.4. Report every wee step of progress.Every single time anything good happens, be sure the boss knows it. Identify some early, likely wins toward your boss’s goals and report victories.5. Give your boss credit and put him or her in the spotlight. When good things happen, give credit to your boss. Create a dashboard that shows progress against your boss’s goals and let your boss show that progress to the board. Your boss will like you for it. If you pitched your organization’s story in a completely new, marketing-savvy way to reporters and that yielded your boss’s photo in the paper, all the better.6. Seek forgiveness, not permission. If all else fails, just do what you want to do anyway, quietly, and tell your boss about it when something good happens.last_img read more

Review of Recent Online Communications Benchmarks Studies

first_imgAs more and more organizations turn to the Internet to enhance and expand their fundraising, advocacy and communications work, a number of key questions have arisen, including:How does our online program compare to other programs?What are reasonable goals for list growth, response rates, churn rates, etc?How can we measure the success of our online work?Until very recently, little data existed with which to answer these questions. However, in the past year, several studies have aimed to establish the benchmarks needed to evaluate the performance of nonprofits’ online communications, advocacy, fundraising, and email messaging programs.We recently reviewed these studies: the eNonprofit Benchmarks Study, the Online Marketing (eCRM) Nonprofit Benchmark Index TM Study, and the donorCentricsTM Internet Giving Benchmarking Analysis, and we have provided a brief summary below of the main findings on which all three studies agree.SHARED FINDINGS The three recent benchmarks studies capture online program metrics from a variety of nonprofits that focus on a multitude of issue areas. Though the data differs somewhat among the studies, one point is perfectly clear: the Internet is the place for nonprofits to invest! 1. Online Giving Is On The Rise All three studies found that the amount of money raised online per organization is rapidly increasing. Though the statistics vary fairly widely, the studies reflect the general trend of growth in nonprofit online fundraising programs.The Online Marketing (eCRM) Nonprofit Benchmark IndexTM reports a growth rate of 27 % in median dollars raised from 2005 to 2006.The eNonprofit Benchmarks Study reports a 40 % growth in average amount raised from the year 2003-2004 to the year 2004-2005.The donorCentrics Analysis reports that the median cumulative growth in online donors amongst its study participants has been 101% over the past three years.2. Rapid Response Pays Both the eNonprofit Benchmarks Study and the donorCentrics Analysis note significant spikes in online donations due to giving after the Asian tsunami and Hurricane Katrina. All three studies emphasize the importance of nonprofits’ quick response to a natural disaster or other breaking news.3. Email Lists Are Growing The eNonprofit Benchmarks Study and the eCRM Nonprofit Benchmarks IndexTM both report growth in email list sizes. The former reports an average growth of 73% across the 15 study partners from September 2004 to September of 2005. The latter reports a median growth rate of 47% from July 2005 to June 2006. In addition, the Index Study reports that organizations with smaller lists (under 50,000) grew twice as fast as those with larger lists.4. Bigger Lists = More Money & More Actions The eNonprofit Benchmarks Study illustrates that email list size is directly proportional to the number of advocacy actions and letters generated. Simply put, the bigger the email list, the larger the number of advocacy actions generated.Likewise, the eCRM Nonprofit Benchmarks IndexTM split funds raised online by email list size to show the difference in amount raised by various file sizes and the trend of larger email lists raising more money holds true.5. Fundraising Messaging Metrics Holding Steady Both the eNonprofit Benchmarks Study and the eCRM Nonprofit Benchmark IndexTM calculated open, click through, response, and conversion rates on fundraising messaging from their data. These metrics have stayed consistent over the last two years.ADDITIONAL INTERESTING FINDINGS 1. Online Donors Versus Offline Donors The 2006 donorCentricsTM Internet Giving Benchmarking Analysis by DonorDigital and Target Analysis Group reviewed data from 12 nonprofit organizations to compare online giving with offline giving. The key takeaways include:Online donors tend to be much younger and to have higher incomes than direct mail donors.The distribution of online donors is more evenly spread over age ranges while direct mail donors are heavily concentrated in the 65-and-older age group.Online donors tend to join at higher giving levels, give larger gifts, and have higher lifetime giving than offline donors.Only 4% of newly acquired online donors also gave direct mail gifts in their first year on the list, but 46% of them gave direct mail gifts in their renewal year.Multiple-channel donors have higher revenue per donor and higher retention rates than single-channel donors.Revenue for donors who gave online was 28% higher ($114 compared to $82) than donors who only gave offline.Donors acquired online tend to lapse at higher rates than donors acquired by mail. Some of this turnover may be attributed differences in cultivation strategies.2. Website Traffic and Site Visitor Registration Convio’s Online Marketing (eCRM) Nonprofit Benchmark IndexTM Study looked at website traffic and visitor registration across 16 client websites. The key points the study found include:The websites received an average of roughly 26,000 unique visitors per month.The groups had a median growth rate of 30 % in unique web visitors in the year studied.Groups with e-newsletters and member center registration had a median registration rate of 2.8 % per month.Recommendations for improving website sign up rates included consistently providing compelling content and incentives to register, optimizing the registration process, and providing multiple engagement opportunities.Source: http://www.mrss.com/last_img read more

How to Use Social Proof in Online Fundraising

first_imgSocial proof is the powerful idea that if we think everyone else is acting in a certain way, we’re likely to act that way, too. People are conformists by nature, and we take cues about how to think and what to do from those around us. Social norms fuel entire industries. Would the fashion world be able to motivate us to buy a narrower tie or a longer skirt this year if we didn’t care what people think?At Network for Good, we’ve used the principle of social norms to increase donations through our web site. We state that more than 100,000 nonprofits have raised more than $800 million through our service to show how easy and safe it is to give through our system. Many charities have “cybergiving week” – that end-of-year spike in online giving. The psychological subtext is simple; everyone’s doing it, so you should too! Here are some ways you can generate social proof for your cause: Once you get some critical mass going, use fundraising tickers. Show how many people are giving, in real time. Count your community: Show how many people have taken action to create a sense of a growing community of like-minded people. Use testimonials: Quotes from people talking about why they support you are powerful. Other people are often your best messengers. In your call to action, choose wording that demonstrates that others are already participating, e.g. “join millions of other generous Americans” or “hundreds of other concerned members in your community”.,Social proof is the powerful idea that if we think everyone else is acting in a certain way, we’re likely to act that way, too. People are conformists by nature, and we take cues about how to think and what to do from those around us. Social norms fuel entire industries. Would the fashion world be able to motivate us to buy a narrower tie or a longer skirt this year if we didn’t care what people think?At Network for Good, we’ve tried using the principle of social norms to increase donations through our web site. We state that more than 325,000 people have given more than $112 million through our web site to show new users just how popular we are. In December 2006, when our traffic increases, we feature a real-time ticker of total donations so people can see just how many other people are taking action. In December 2006 and 2005, we partnered with Yahoo! on a “cybergiving week” to promote the idea that just as retail sales has black Friday, charities have “cybergiving week” – that end-of-year spike in online giving. The psychological subtext? Everyone’s doing it so you, should too! Fundraising thermometers and also send the message, “Other people are doing it, and you are part of something larger.”Here are some ways you can generate social proof:• Once you get some critical mass going, use fundraising tickers. Show how many people are giving, in real time.• Count your community: Show how many people have taken action to create a sense of a growing community of like-minded people.• Use testimonials: Quotes from people talking about why they support you are powerful. Other people are often your best messengers.• In calls to action, choose wording that demonstrates that others are already participating, e.g. “join millions of other generous Americans” or “hundreds of other concerned members in your community”last_img read more

10 Steps To Re-infusing Passion Into Your Organization

first_imgCelebrate outside-the-box thinking. Organize brainstorming meetings. Encourage employees to think outside the box to come up with unconventional solutions to problems or opportunities. Sometimes it’s best to eliminate authority figures from these meetings to allow a free flow of thoughts and a process that gives birth to fresh ideas.Have fun. Everyone knows what this means and what it looks like. In our company it’s practical jokes; it’s strange sounds on the intercom; it’s games and competitions; it’s going out to eat together or just sitting around shooting the breeze. You can see fun when you see laughter and the celebration of work.Publish your vision and mission. Do employees actually know what your vision and mission is? If not, it’s either because you don’t have them or you haven’t published them. Get them out there. Talk about them. Explain how you came up with them. Remember, THIS is why you are together.Create and publish your list of values. You have a set of values that you run the organization by. If it is not written down, then it’s informal. Write down the list. Include a focus on the people served, your donors, and fun. Publish it. Talk about it. Ask employees to hold you and others accountable to live by it.Bring a person your organization regularly serves into your environment. There is nothing like looking into the eyes of one of the people that has been helped by your organization. Bring them in, if possible, and sit them right down in the middle of the sacred halls. Have them interrupt the process of running the organization. Place them in a place (meeting) where everyone needs to focus on the real thing that is going on here. Talk to them about their journey. What was their life like before your organization helped them? How is it now? How do they feel? Get in touch with all of these. Don’t be afraid of it. Embrace it.Keep talking always about people served and donors. We mentioned it several times, but it is worth mentioning again. Remember, everything you do is about the people you serve and your donors. It is important to keep that focus.Get away from your desk and regularly talk to others about how excited you are about the people you serve and your donors. It is so easy to get wrapped up in the work and be stuck to your desk all day or in meetings. Plan to be absent from your desk. Put it on your calendar. Get out of your office and be with your staff for no reason but just to talk. Spread your joy. Share a story of how a person the organization helped really touched you. Talk about a donor and how encouraged you are about their help.Get emotional about things. This isn’t just about plans, charts, grids, logic and the mind. It is about people. Allow your heart to be broken by the tragedies of life. Celebrate the victories. Get excited. Jump up and down. Be human. When your employees sense that you do have blood running through those veins; that you can cry and laugh; that you are real when they sense that, you will be on your way to getting passion back into the workplace.These are just some of the ideas we have on getting passion back into the workplace. Share your ideas with us. We’d like to hear them. And if you give us permission, we’d like to publish them. Talk back.Source: Merkle Orange Papershttp://www.merkledomain.com/site/PageServer?pagename=orange_passionCopyright © 2007 Merkle Inc.All rights reserved Take steps to fall back in love with donors. They are the true stakeholders in your organization. The board isn’t. The president isn’t. Even you aren’t. It is the donor who truly owns the charity. Why not start behaving that way? Here are some things you can do to remind yourself (and everyone else) that, after the person who is helped by your charity, the next most important person is the donor:Regularly (once a week) read donor letters to employees or pass excerpts along via e-mail. Focus especially on donor letters that express gratitude for being able to serve.Have a donor come in and address employees in a company or department meeting. Ask them why they are involved and why they stay involved.Encourage employees to call or visit with donors to talk about their motivations for being involved. You come to work lifeless. Everyone around you has that look in their eyes: a glaze that signals boredom, purposelessness, fatalism.“What am I doing here?” you ask. Good question. What are you doing? If you are a leader or manager and you see this zombie-like state among your organization’s employees, there is something you can and should do about it.What are the key indicators that an organization has lost its passion, and how do you counteract it?Key Signs That Your Organization Lacks PassionThe leader is really not excited about what the organization does. In fact, many employees aren’t either. They are there more for the paycheck than the cause.There is no clear mission or purpose.No one talks or cares about who ultimately benefits from what the organization does.Managers and leaders are more focused on process than they are on doing good work.There is no overarching vision for the organization.There is a noticeable absence of flexibility. Everything is very regimented and very predictable. Outside-the-box thinking is discouraged.There is a lack of culture and personality; fun is not promoted.There is a lot of turf protection and lack of cooperation between individuals and departments.10 Steps To Re-infusing Passion Into Your OrganizationTake steps to fall back in love with those who are helped by your organization. Who are they? How is your organization helping to change their lives? How can you help more? Here are some ways to inspire the people in your organization to move the focus from themselves back to the people you are organized to serve:Once a week, share a story with your staff about a dilemma faced by a person served by your organization. This will most likely be a dilemma that has not yet been resolved. The purpose of this exercise is to keep employees focused on why your organization exists.Once a week, share a success story about someone who has been helped by your organization. This will cement in your employees’ minds that what you are doing is really working.In your monthly company meeting, have an employee speak about the vision and mission of your organization and what it means on a personal level to him or her. This will remind your employees that what you are doing is important.Do everything possible to give the people helped by your organization prominence. Hang pictures of them in the halls. Talk about them. Ask, “How does my job serve the people we are helping?” Remember, it is about them. Nothing else matters very much.last_img read more

What is Twitter and What Can a Nonprofit Do With It?

first_imgI realize that many people in nonprofits may answer that question with “I don’t use Twitter.”  I’m not saying everyone should.  But for those who have adopted it or are thinking about it, the next step is to find a style of use and how to integrate it into your work flow.What It Is:Twitter is a microblogging tool that allows users to post short updatesYou follow your friends and groups you’re interested inYou can get your messages via IM, mobile text, or the webTwitter changes some expectations associated with online communications – you are limited to 140 characters per updateHow It Might Be Used:Social while at a conference to find better sessions or partiesUsing Twitter as a virtual water cooler.Industry gossipShare resources or blog postsDrive traffic web page/blog or commentsAsk a question, get an answerGet referralsAd hoc collaborationsSending reports in an emergencyGetting newsProduct recommendations while in a storeSolicitation tool for a fundraising campaign“That’s the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard of it.”  That’s what my husband said the other night when I showed him Twitter.  He also added, there’s more effective ways to spend your time.   Then, he went through the Twitter Life CycleThe next question is something like, “What’s an effective way to use it?”Stay hyper connected or take a break?Dip in or submerge?Trend Tracking:You can now track concepts on Twitter via your cell phone. You can track keywords like “Nonprofit” or you can ego track “Beth Kanter.” Jermiah Owyang suggests “This could provide more utility for those that are responsible for watching certain markets, products, or even emergency use.”  Sources: http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2007/10/dip-in-or-subme.html and http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2007/10/trend-tacking-w.htmllast_img read more

Who and why before how

first_imgWhen I’m asked about whether I think a marketing campaign is good, I always ask:Who was the audience and what action was the campaign seeking to effect?These are good questions to ask yourself before you launch any marketing effort. Is it well targeted? Will it resonate with the audience in question? Is it consistent with your brand? Will it get people to act in the way you want?In other words, you’d better know who and why you’re marketing before you jump to how to market something.Some colleagues recently called my attention to two campaigns, and while they both have merits, I”m not sure they nailed the “who and why” before they leaped to the “how.”Here’s the first, which was a PETA campaign that was eloquently blogged by CK. It’s a website trashing the Olsen twins for wearing fur, providing interactive, bloody dress-up games, and a faux Full house video, which unfortunately is nearly as boring and unwatchable as the show.So does trashing these celebrities make sense as a marketing strategy? It really depends on what PETA is trying to do. If they are trying to please their base, yes. It’s a highly negative, on-the-attack, celebrity-shaming, attention-grabbing campaign that is completely aligned with PETA’s brand and followers. If it’s trying to get online media attention for PETA, it also makes sense because it’s blogworthy. If it’s trying to get the Olsens or other celebs to embrace PETA’s cause and/or get new people to support PETA by writing to the Olsens or giving money, I doubt this will work. Going that negative will just estrange the mainstream, which includes people who like Mary Kate and Ashley or, if they don’t, prefer to visit Perez than PETA for their Trollsen dose. Quite simply, the campaign encourages people to think of PETA as being “fringe,” which I think is far less scary than being influential. So if the “who” is new audiences and the “what” is eschewing fur, I don’t think it works.On to a campaign that is the polar opposite of the Trollsens – it’s a feel-good spot sent to me by a reader from Italy. Daniele writes:I’m working for a campaign called superegali.org for the NGO Terre des Hommes Italia. It’s a fundraising campaign for Perù, Ivory Coast and Zimbabwe to help kids of these countries. We made a viral video for this campaign where the protagonist is our mascot, a paper toy. The video is a spoof of Dove Onslaught.(If you want to know what the Dove campaign is, I posted on there here.)I thought the video was cute (especially if you’re familiar with the cultural reference of the Dove campaign) for an audience of potential supporters in Italy – provided they know the Dove campaign. But the “why” was unclear. What does the ad want you to do? It seems to ask you to rethink the concept of superhero, but it’s not clear what you’re supposed to do as a result, or how cutting out superheroes helps kids. I think the campaign is interesting but has a perplexing (perhaps even absent) call to action. So I asked Daniele what was the “why” of the campaign. She responded the purpose was to spread the word about their work and raise money. If that’s the “why” of the campaign, I think it could use some tweaking. Thoughts for Daniele?last_img read more