Hyper Gold by Microgaming

first_imgSlots Hyper Gold by Microgaming Developed exclusively for Microgaming by Gameburger Studios, Hyper Gold keeps the party vibe going all night with Hyper free spins and a Link&Win experience that racks up mega gold wins! Activate the Win booster for increased odds of triggering the Link&Win and cash in on mega prizes! 25th May 2021 | By Aaron Noy Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter You can download the First Look Games affiliate pack for Hyper Gold here!center_img Email Address Topics: Casino & games Slots Go-live date (expected):25/5/2021Game special features:– Hyper free spins– Link&Win– Win boosterNumber of paylines:25Number of reels:5×3RTP% (recorded/theoretical):96.08%Variance/volatility:HighNumber of symbols to trigger feature/bonus?3Can feature be retriggered?YesNumber of free spins awarded?10Stacked or expanding wilds in normal play?Single wildStacked or expanding wilds in feature play?Single wildNumber of jackpot tiers?4Auto-play function?Yes AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterlast_img read more

Late payments tackled online

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. If you’re facing problems with late payments by suppliers there is a new Web-based service to help you. Getaresult has been set up by the Credit Protection Association and helps small businesses to resolve late payment problems for a set fee of £22 per debt. Howard Lake | 27 June 2000 | News Late payments tackled online AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  13 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis read more

New chairman at Northumberland and Durham Lord Taverners

first_imgNew chairman at Northumberland and Durham Lord Taverners Howard Lake | 29 March 2006 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Northumberland and Durham region of the Lord’s Taverners, cricket’s official charity, announces the appointment of its new chairman, Colin Basey.Colin, who lives in Stocksfield Northumberland, is a former senior banker with Barclays and has spent over 20 years as the charity’s treasurer before taking up the role of chairman. Colin, a passionate cricketer for many years, has already seen over £1million raised during his time as treasurer and is seeking to build upon the successes of previous Chairmen in developing the profile of the Lord’s Taverners across the region. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Management Recruitment / people  49 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

HBOS Million £ Challenge raises £3.6 million in 2007

first_img Howard Lake | 8 January 2008 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  22 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis HBOS Million £ Challenge raises £3.6 million in 2007 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: corporate Staff, customers and shareholders of HBOS across the UK and Ireland raised £3.6 million in 2007 for charity. A partnership between Family Holiday Association and RNLI received over £800,000, and the British Heart Foundation received over £1.8 million, its largest corporate donation to date. WRVS, and Age Action in Ireland also benefited.Richard Popper, Head of Central Fundraising, RNLI said: “As a result of the money received from the HBOS Million £ Challenge, thousands of disadvantaged families will enjoy their first ever seaside holiday enabled by the FHA, and the RNLI will be assisted in expanding its Lifeguard Service to new areas, ensuring that more families benefit from its beach safety initiatives and have a safe and happy holiday.’Over 30,000 staff at HBOS plc (which includes Halifax, Bank of Scotland, Birmingham Midshires, Clerical Medical, esure, Insight Investment and Intelligent Finance) raised funds for the HBOS Charity of the Year programme, the Million £ Challenge. The initial target was to collect £1 million for the British Heart Foundation, the main recipient of the programme. That target was beaten in May and during the remainder of the year another £2.4 million was raised which is being shared equally between the British Heart Foundation, WRVS and the Family Holiday Association in partnership with the RNLI.Every £1 raised has been matched pound for pound by the HBOS Foundation to reach the £3.6 million total.Previous recipients of the Million £ Challenge have included Macmillan Cancer Support, Help the Hospices, NSPCC/Children 1st and ICAN.www.hbosfoundation.orglast_img read more

GSK give over £245,000 to Down’s Syndrome Association

first_img The Down’s Syndrome Association has received more than £245,000 from GlaxoSmithKline.The funds are to promote the Shifting Perspectives photography exhibition worldwide over the three years from 2010 to 2013, and to start an annual international photography competition for people with Down’s syndrome.The competition will be open for submissions from autumn 2009 and the winners will be announced at a ceremony in London in June 2010. Advertisement  41 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Funding GSK give over £245,000 to Down’s Syndrome Associationcenter_img Howard Lake | 29 August 2009 | News www.downs-syndrome.org.uk About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Lorraine Hansberry: Political activist, artist

first_imgLorraine HansberryIt is 50 years since Lorraine Hansberry, a renowned playwright and political activist on the left, died on Jan. 12, 1965. Only 34, she had led a full life and intervened in many of the significant developments in the African-American liberation movement of the 1960s.Hansberry was born in Chicago during the Great Depression. Her father, Carl Hansberry, played a pivotal role there in the struggle to end restrictive housing covenants. After he purchased a home in a previously all-white neighborhood, a group of white residents organized mobs and legal challenges to block the sale, citing restrictive covenants that prohibited the sale of houses to African Americans, Jews and others.In 1866, right after the Civil War, Congress had passed the Civil Rights Act, which ostensibly provided citizenship rights to African people as well as provisions to guard against discrimination in housing. But the law was largely ignored for decades.Carl Hansberry filed a lawsuit against the practice, winning a favorable ruling in 1940 from the U.S. Supreme Court. The Hansberry v. Lee decision constituted the beginning of the end of restrictive covenants.Hansberry’s work on the leftDuring the late 1940s, Lorraine Hansberry attended the University of Wisconsin and joined the Young Progressives of America (YPA) and the Labor Youth League (LYL). These organizations were committed to ending the Cold War, working for world peace and racial equality.Hansberry also developed an interest in African affairs. She later studied African culture and history with W.E.B. DuBois at the Jefferson School for Social Sciences in New York. She wrote a paper for the DuBois course on the Belgian Congo, illustrating her burgeoning consciousness related to African affairs and anti-colonialism.All three of these organizations — the YPA, LYL and the Jefferson School — had been established by the Communist Party and had close links to its mass activities.While taking a class at the Jefferson School, she met legendary artist, actor, social scientist and activist Paul Robeson. During the early 1950s, Hansberry joined the staff of Freedom newspaper, another CP-oriented initiative based in Harlem and headed by Robeson. She began work at the paper as a subscription clerk, receptionist, typist and editorial assistant, and was quickly promoted to associate editor.According to the website of Columbia University’s Social Justice Movement, Hansberry was “regularly in contact with Robeson and DuBois and used the opportunity to expand her understanding of race, politics, and culture. She authored several articles for Freedom. Within its pages she celebrated victories of newly independent nations against their former European colonizers, explored the origins of American political economy, delineated the expression of the American political economy in its maintenance of racially-based ghettoes, dealt with cultural structures and institutions that preserved racism, and defended colleagues under ideological attack from the FBI and anti-communist Senator Joe McCarthy.”In 1953, Hansberry met Jewish songwriter and activist Robert Nemeroff on a picket line in New York City. The two were married. They divorced in 1962 but continued to work together.Freedom newspaper, like other progressive and left institutions, came under attack during the Cold War and was eventually forced out of existence.Hansberry makes mark on BroadwayHansberry entered the literary and theater scene with pioneering achievements in the late 1950s. Her play “A Raisin in the Sun” took Broadway by storm in 1959, being the first production authored by an African-American woman. The play was later made into a film starring Sidney Poitier and Ruby Dee.The play told of the struggle of an African-American, working-class family to advance their social status. The multigenerational family debates what to do with an inheritance. A decision is made to divide the money between purchasing a home in an all-white neighborhood, the mother’s preference, and acquiring a liquor license by the son, played by Sidney Poitier. The son is swindled by his partners, but the family moves into the white neighborhood.“Raisin” won the New York Critics’ Circle Award. The film earned similar recognition at the Cannes Film Festival. In addition to this successful play, Hansberry wrote extensively on issues of race, gender and sexuality.As early as 1957, she joined the Daughters of Bilitis, a lesbian organization, and contributed letters to their magazine, The Ladder, about feminism and homophobia.Escalation of activism and militancyAfter 1963, Hansberry moved further to the left, joining the Civil Rights Movement. In 1963, she participated in a meeting with then U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy and questioned the administration’s commitment to racial equality.At a public meeting in New York on June 15, 1964, she called for encouraging “the white liberal to stop being a liberal and become an American radical,” adding that “some of the first people who have died so far in this struggle have been white men.”Hansberry tragically died of pancreatic cancer in early 1965. Her works during this period, later consolidated into other productions by her former spouse, included “Les Blancs” (1970) and “To Be Young, Gifted and Black” (1968-69).Hansberry made a significant contribution to the artistic and political expression of the African-American people in the struggle against national oppression and economic exploitation. Her writings and social activism will inevitably be studied by generations to come.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Muslim meatcutters in Colorado battle Cargill for right to pray

first_imgCargill, an international conglomerate with 155,000 employees in 68 countries, claims that “we help people thrive.” The 190 workers the company fired in December from its Fort Morgan, Colo., meatpacking plant would likely disagree.Workers at Cargill.Cargill employs about 2,000 workers at the plant; around 600 are Somali immigrants. Until December these Muslim workers were allowed to pray in the plant at the times prescribed by their faith — which vary depending on the season. They were not given any extra time away from their jobs as meatcutters, but were able to use their paid breaks and unpaid lunchtime to pray in the “reflection room” provided by the company.On Dec. 18 they were abruptly told, “If you want to pray, go home.” (Denver Post, Dec. 31) Not accepting what they saw as an affront, 200 Muslim workers, most of them Somali, walked off the job on Dec. 21. After refusing to return to work until their religious rights were restored, 190 workers, some with as much as 10 years’ seniority, were fired two days later. Under company policy they cannot reapply for their jobs for six months.This firing was a blatantly illegal act of religious discrimination. Employers are legally required to make accommodations so that workers need not choose between working and following their faith. Courts have ruled that denying such accommodations violates Title VII of the 1964 federal Civil Rights Act. Title VII has meant, for example, that a Seventh Day Adventist cannot be forced to work on Saturday. Yet, according to the Denver Post, plant manager Michael Martin claims, “Accommodation is not guaranteed every day and depends on changing factors in the plant.” In other words, the company will respect your civil rights but only if its production schedules — driven by the profit motive — allow.Cargill claims to be “committed to feeding the world in a responsible way, reducing environmental impact and improving the communities where we live and work.” (cargill.com) The company’s record, including this latest outrage, tells a different story. In 2002 Teamsters in Cleveland were forced to strike the company’s salt mine over egregious concessionary demands. The International Labor Rights Fund sued Cargill in 2005, along with Nestle and others, charging involvement in human trafficking and forced child labor in Mali. In 2011 Cargill was the subject of one of the largest meat recalls on record. The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) is negotiating on behalf of the fired workers to reverse the racist, anti-immigrant, Islamophobic firings.Where is the union?Workers at the Cargill plant are represented by Teamsters Local 455. Yet the local’s website has no information about this important workers’ struggle. There should be at least a grievance over the mass firings, first and foremost on the basis of discrimination. Most, if not all, union contracts prohibit discrimination on the basis of religion and national origin, among other categories. Even if only one or two union workers were facing discrimination, the union’s obligation would be to uphold civil rights and oppose divisive prejudice that threatens solidarity. At Cargill the issue affects about 600 Somali Muslim immigrants — over 28 percent of the workforce.There is another grievable matter: Were the workers afforded their legal right to have their union representative present when they were dismissed? The union could also file a “past practice” grievance, over the company’s sudden, arbitrary suspension of a practice allowing workers to pray every day in accordance with their beliefs. Past practices, unwritten but generally accepted by both parties, are legally binding under a collective bargaining agreement.If this multinational Teamster local challenges these illegal firings, it will strengthen solidarity and help the workers fight for better wages. Right now the average wage is $14 an hour, not enough to support a family. Moreover, this struggle could be the basis for a labor-community coalition against Islamophobia, jointly spearheaded by CAIR and the Teamsters. Whether it is Donald Trump or companies like Cargill that is the enemy, the labor movement must take a stand wherever bigotry raises its ugly head.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Free Ahmad Sa’adat & all Palestinian prisoners!

first_imgAs one of the events opening the International Week of Action to Free Ahmad Sa’adat and all Palestinian prisoners, a protest was organized here on Jan. 15 under the famous arch in Washington Square Park. It was called by Samidoun Palestinian Prisoner Solidarity Network. The crowd chanted, “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free!” and other slogans in support of justice for Palestine. A number of left parties and organizations, including Workers World Party, joined the demonstration, carrying signs and banners in support of the Palestinian struggle. Activists distributed flyers about Palestine and Palestinian prisoners to passersby, including information about the case of Ahmad Sa’adat, the imprisoned general secretary of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.Sa’adat was arrested 17 years ago by the Palestinian Authority in the context of “security cooperation” with the Israelis. In 2006, he was seized from a Palestinian Authority prison in Jericho, where he was being held under U.S. and British guards, and brought before an Israeli military court. There he was sentenced to 30 years in prison for leading a prohibited organization and “incitement.”The PFLP is a major organization in Palestinian resistance to Israeli occupation. From behind bars, Sa’adat has been a leader in both the Palestinian prisoners’ movement and the Palestinian national liberation movement. He stands alongside nearly 6,000 fellow Palestinian political prisoners as a symbol of internationalist resistance to capitalism, racism, apartheid and colonization.On Jan. 24, Khaled Barakat, the international coordinator of the Campaign to Free Ahmad Sa’adat, will be speaking at a forum and discussion about the campaign hosted by the International Action Center and Workers World Party. The forum will be held at 147 West 24th St. in Manhattan and starts at 6:30 p.m.(PHOTO CREDIT: Bud Korotzer/Desertpeace)FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

High school hoops: FWCD falls, Paschal and Arlington Heights win nail-biters

first_imgGrains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Linkedin Twitter Nick Stephenshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/nick-stephens/ Twitter Nick Stephenshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/nick-stephens/ Nick is a senior journalism student from Cleveland, Ohio. He covers the TCU soccer team for TCU 360. Nick is an honors student and is minoring in music. High school hoops: Paschal and FWCD fall, Arlington Heights wins road tilt Nick Stephenshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/nick-stephens/ Previous articleWomen’s tennis falls to Texas A&M, looks ahead to RiceNext articleHigh school hoops: Paschal and FWCD fall, Arlington Heights wins road tilt Nick Stephens RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Nick Stephens + posts center_img ReddIt ReddIt Soccer’s historic season ends in Round of 32 High school hoops: Arlington Heights and Country Day lose, Paschal survives Facebook Nick Stephenshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/nick-stephens/ Facebook High school hoops: Paschal and Arlington Heights win, struggles continue for Country Day Linkedin printFort Worth’s Southwest Prep Conference basketball playoff’s kicked off with nail-biting games.Fort Worth Country Day improved their performance during the second half of Friday night, January 18, basketball game, but St. Mark’s School of Texas proved too talented and defeated the Falcons 49-39.The Falcons knew it was going to be a tall task. St. Mark’s is nationally ranked and many of the players are being recruited by Division I colleges. FWCD head coach Joe Breedlove employed a deliberate tempo to keep the Lions out of rhythm, but the early deficit proved too much to overcome.FWCD takes on Riverside in a non-district matchup. Photo courtesy of FWCD.Several possessions were made against the Falcons as they swung the ball around the perimeter of the court looking for openings. They struggled to find those openings on the night, shooting 16-38 (42.1 percent) from the field.FWCD was led by the duo senior Drew Chilcoat and sophomore Ayris Gratts-Cole.Chilcoat led the team in scoring 12 points on 5-11 shooting from the field. Gratts-Cole chipped in nine points and grabbed 12 rebounds in an impressive individual performance.Junior Andrew Laczkowski, coming off an offer from the University of San Diego, led the way for St. Mark’s. His combination of size and ball-handling was difficult for FWCD to contain.Laczkowski isn’t the only big name on the St. Mark’s roster: First-year forward Colin Smith has an offer from Kansas and first-year guard Noah Shelby received an offer from Baylor.Paschal poses with a trophy after a victory last year. Photo courtesy of Matt Shabay.The loss drops FWCD to 0-1 in the Southwest Prep Conference.Friday night proved much more successful for other area high schools, however: both Paschal and Arlington Heights emerged victorious from their respective basketball district clashes.Paschal defeated the Fort Worth Young Men’s Leadership Academy 44-43 in a low-scoring affair. The victory moves Paschal to 4-5 in district 4-6A play, placing them fifth in the league.Arlington Heights defeated North Side, 51-49, at home in Billingsley Field House. The win puts Arlington Heights at 4-3 in district 6-5A and fourth in the league.What’s nextCountry Day will look to rebound on Wednesday, January 23, at 7:30 p.m. when they host Cistercian (17-3, 2-0).Paschal returns home Tuesday, January 22, at 7:30 p.m. to host North Crowley (26-3, 10-0), considered to be a contender for the state title.Arlington Heights will head on the road for an away game against Southwest on Tuesday, January 22, at 7:30 p.m. Southwest (17-9, 6-2) is directly ahead of the Yellowjackets in district play. Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturdaylast_img read more

Limerick call for action on elder abuse

first_imgWalk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April TAGSfeaturedolder elder Limerick Facebook No vaccines in Limerick yet First Irish death from Coronavirus Shannondoc operating but only by appointment NewsLocal NewsLimerick call for action on elder abuseBy Bernie English – June 5, 2014 574 Email Linkedin Printcenter_img WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Advertisement Previous articleLimerick set for parade of herosNext articleMan denies slashing friend’s neck over car crash Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. CALLS have been made for unannounced checks to uncover rogue nursing homes amid claims that incidents of elder abuse in Limerick are on the increase.The call came from Oliver Creighton of the Limerick Seniors Forum ahead of an event to increase awareness of a problem which is causing misery for older people.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Latest figures show that where abuse is happening in the community, half of all abusers are the adult children of the victim while 20 per cent are the spouses of the victim.More older people are falling foul of financial abuse, with adult children collecting pensions and spending it on themselves.“We know that it is happening in Limerick and that it is on the increase, What is missing is the awareness”, Mr Creighton said.“Many elderly people don’t want to talk about what is happening because it may be their own children who are abusing them and people don’t want to admit that. But there is help available,” he told the Limerick Post.The Forum representative said that abuse can take many forms “including neglect, lack of washing or proper nutrition and this doesn’t just happen in the family home – we have seen certain nursing homes being closed because of it.“But what we don’t agree with is that when an inspection takes place, the home is given a time and date. All inspections should be unannounced. Even when they’re given advance warnings, some of these homes still don’t come up to standard”.International World Elder Abuse Awareness Day takes place on June 15. Established by the United Nations five years ago, the event is part of a strategy to raise public awareness about elder abuse in its many forms; physical, sexual, psychological, financial, discriminatory and neglect.Its main purpose is to encourage communities to recognize the problem of elder abuse, and for countries to create policies that foster respect for elders and provide them with the tools to continue to be productive citizens.Limerick Seniors Forum will hold a free event to discuss and provide information on issues around Elder Abuse Awareness on Monday June 9, from 11am  in the Absolute Hotel. Speakers will include Elder Abuse specialist, Dr. Amanda Phelan as well as representatives of An Garda Siochana and the HSE.Further information is available on www.limerickseniorsforum.ie Twitter Surgeries and clinic cancellations extended Proceedures and appointments cancelled again at UHLlast_img read more