Spurs team news & likely line-up vs Palace

first_imgTottenham Hotspur Tottenham team news: Injuries, suspensions and line-up vs Crystal Palace Harry Sherlock Last updated 1 year ago 15:38 2/25/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(1) Lucas Moura Tottenham Getty Images Tottenham Hotspur Premier League Crystal Palace v Tottenham Hotspur Crystal Palace Mauricio Pochettino’s men will hope to bounce back from a poor showing in their 2-2 draw with Rochdale in the FA Cup Tottenham take on Crystal Palace in the Premier League this weekend, looking to recover from their embarrassing 2-2 draw with Rochdale in the FA Cup.Spurs took a 2-1 lead in the dying minutes, only to allow the lower-league side back into the tie, with Rochdale now set to visit Wembley in the replay.Palace have not won since January, however, and Spurs seemingly have the perfect opportunity to bounce back. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player TOTTENHAM INJURIES Mauricio Pochettino has a fully fit squad to choose from, and could give Lucas Moura his Premier League bow after the Brazilian sparkled against Rochdale, scoring his first goal for the club.TOTTENHAM SUSPENSIONS Spurs have no suspended players.TOTTENHAM STARTING LINE-UP With the FA Cup replay on the horizon, Pochettino is unlikely to tinker too much with his strongest XI.Lucas Moura could start, however, while Davinson Sanchez is set to continue in defence after Toby Alderweireld struggled last time out.Harry Kane will surely lead the line, while Serge Aurier and Ben Davies could play as full-backs after Kieran Trippier and Danny Rose featured against Rochdale.Spurs XICRYSTAL PALACE TEAM NEWS Roy Hodgson has a number of injury problems to contend with ahead of the game with Spurs.Mamadou Sakho is a slight doubt with a calf strain, while reported Spurs target Wilfried Zaha could also miss out due to a knee injury.Martin Kelly has a hamstring injury, while Julian Speroni (knee), Bakary Sako (ankle), Jeffrey Schlupp (knee) and Scott Dann (knee) are all sidelined, along with Jason Puncheon, Ruben Loftus-Cheek and Connor Wickham.Roy Hodgson, Crystal PalaceTV CHANNEL & KICK OFF TIME The match kicks off at 12:00 GMT on Sunday, with live television coverage available on Sky Sports in the UK. BEST OPTA MATCH FACTS Crystal Palace have lost their last five Premier League games against Tottenham Hotspur, scoring just one goal in the process. However, the Eagles did win an FA Cup fifth round match against the Lilywhites in February 2016. Spurs will be looking to win three consecutive away league games against Crystal Palace for the first time in their history. Kane has scored 13 goals in his last 12 Premier League appearances in the month of February, scoring in both matches this month. Palace have scored five Premier League penalties this season, with no side scoring more (level with Everton and Man City); Spurs are one of three sides (also Leicester and Man City) yet to concede from the spot. Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

Fabinho urges Fekir to join him at Liverpool

first_imgTransfers Fabinho urges Fekir to join him at Liverpool Dejan Kalinic 11:00 5/29/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Fekir-Cropped Getty Images Transfers Liverpool Olympique Lyonnais Premier League Ligue 1 The new Reds signing hopes the France international attacker joins him at Anfield Liverpool signing Fabinho called on Lyon star Nabil Fekir to join him at the Premier League club.Fabinho’s switch to Anfield from Monaco was confirmed on Monday, the Brazil international signing a long-term contract after the clubs agreed to a deal worth €45 million (£39m/$52m) plus bonuses of up to another €5m.Jurgen Klopp’s Champions League runners-up are expected to be very active in the close-season, with Goal reporting Liverpool are stepping up their pursuit of Fekir.  Article continues below Editors’ Picks Goalkeeper crisis! Walker to the rescue but City sweating on Ederson injury ahead of Liverpool clash Out of his depth! Emery on borrowed time after another abysmal Arsenal display Diving, tactical fouls & the emerging war of words between Guardiola & Klopp Sorry, Cristiano! Pjanic is Juventus’ most important player right now After facing Fekir in Ligue 1, Fabinho said he wanted the France international as a team-mate in the Premier League.Asked if he wanted Fekir to sign for Liverpool, Fabinho told RMC Sport: “Yes.”He is a very good player, of international level. In Ligue 1, it is not only this season that he has shown things.”It’s been a few years of him demonstrating his quality. If he comes, it will be good too.”Fabinho joined Liverpool after five seasons at Monaco, where he won the Ligue 1 title in 2016-17.After scoring in France’s 2-0 friendly win over the Republic of Ireland, Fekir said: “If Fabinho will be my future team-mate? I will discuss about my future after the World Cup, not before.”If I will sign somewhere before the World Cup? Honestly, I don’t know.” Subscribe to Goal’s Liverpool Correspondent Neil Jones’ weekly email bringing you the best Liverpool FC writing from around the weblast_img read more

WORLD CUP SELECTION AT NTL

first_imgSelection for the 2007 World Cup in South Africa is on the line at the upcoming 2006 NTL.TFA has released the World Cup Selection Process and the Player Selection Registration Form.WORLD CUP SELECTION PROCESSPLAYER SELECTION REGISTRATION FORMEnquiries can be sent to Colm Maguire, TFA National Game Development Manager at colm@austouch.com.aulast_img

In The Spotlight – Ben Moylan

first_imgIn the fifth edition of In The Spotlight, Australian Men’s Open player, Ben Moylan, speaks about how he got involved in Touch Football and the biggest influences on his Touch Football career.   Name: Ben MoylanNickname: RangaAge: 21Affiliate: Penrith/Sydney MetsOccupation: GreenkeeperPosition: MiddleDebut for Australia: 2009 Youth Trans TasmanCareer highlights so far: 2009 Youth Trans Tasman, 2009 and 2010 Mixed Open Trans TasmanHow you got involved in Touch Football: I played in a school Touch tournament when I was 10 and Colm Maguire (a development officer at the time) thought I should go and play for an affiliate. He organised me to play at Penrith and have been there ever since.Favourite player: Chris BenfieldWhat does it mean to you to be representing Australia at the 2011 World Cup: It means a lot to me. It is what I have always wanted to do in my chosen sport. I am also very honoured to be able to represent our country.Biggest influence on your Touch Football career: My parents have influenced my career a lot not only financially but also morally. Without them I wouldn’t have been playing at all. Also my Penrith coach David Collins has also been there during my career and is always pushing me to do better on and off the field.Favourite sporting moment: Beating New Zealand in 2009 Mixed Open Trans Tasman in Wollongong in front of my family and friends.What do you know about Scotland: Don’t eat haggis.Any superstitions: I always put my left boot on before my right boot.Funniest Australian teammate: Nick Good or Anthony ZiadeFavourite quote: “a man that does his best has done enough”Any travel plans for after World Cup: Barcelona, London and Amsterdam.Stay tuned to the website for the upcoming editions of In The Spotlight, which will feature every Open’s player travelling to the World Cup. With only 49 days to go until the 2011 Federation of International Touch World Cup, be sure to be regularly visiting the Touch Football Australia website to keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information. Don’t forget to become a fan of Touch Football Australia on Facebook and Twitter in the lead up to the 2011 World Cup to find out all you need to know about Australia’s World Cup campaign:http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Touch-Football-Australia/384949403384 www.twitter.com/touchfootyauslast_img read more

Change the World by Working in a Virtual One: Interview with Evonne Heyning

first_imgHow does your organization use Second Life?Amoration is a nonprofit studio developing ManorMeta, a futuristic TV/DVD series and interactive online network for families around the globe. ManorMeta’s growing architecture has quickly taken over our free time. ManorMeta premiered in early 2006 and quickly became a destination for world-changers and innovators in design, education, sustainability, artificial intelligence, and the arts. Our goal has been to produce a family media series built on a very fantastic new technological age.ManorTV is kid-friendly edutainment now in early production. Our virtual home has six foster kids, three adults, numerous animal and computer-generated characters, and is filled with music, humor, and technological magic. (Think: next-generation “Sesame Street.”)Amoration, our 501(c)3 organization, has produced media and developed new concepts for programming in the virtual world since December 2005. We have provided support on nonprofit projects such as Camp Darfur, producing crossover print and video machinima from our builds to compliment real world awareness events. The ZeroOne art show (a festival of art and digital culture that took place in San Jose, California in August 2006) increased demand for our rare designs and we opened two ManorMeta Mineral Matrix education shops to build a growing business in the virtual world.Why did you decide to do something in Second Life? After a fun job interview in the virtual world in the Summer of 2005 and encouragement from Sue Stonebender and friends from the Omidyar Network (a mission-based investment group committed to fostering individual self-empowerment on a global scale), I gave Second Life a test run in January of 2006. With the pilot for the ManorMeta series nearly finished, we needed a dynamic, collaborative building space that would help us develop our ideas on interactivity in real and virtual spaces. Second Life became a tremendous tool for set and character development and storyboarding – now, story ideas emerge from our Second dramas! We’ve successfully turned our early-adopter audience into active participants by starting our process in the virtual world.How was the project planned? What expertise was needed? We have had mostly positive results in presentations with potential partners, Amoration Advisors, and volunteers. The world is intriguing enough to gather interest, but few find they have enough juice and bandwidth to sign up for Second Life and join us in the virtual world on a regular basis. Those who meet us there and play often get very involved in like-minded projects! Some who cannot join us in Second Life still spread the meme through the Web; we provide them with a natural spotlight space with links and interactive content at no cost.Our first development award came from a key Linden partner so we did not worry that our investment in the platform would be considered wasteful. We found our virtual world meeting enhanced our work with Omidyar Network and other leaders from many different disciplines. We host some advisor meetings in-world (in Second Life) as a way to stay connected and integrated with our virtual space.The learning curve has been steep and it has taken us every bit of nine months to learn building, scripting, event hosting, and media production in-world. We have tried to do this without investing extra money into Second Life; instead of hiring scriptwriters and machinima producers, we learned how to do it ourselves.How did the project unfold? What were some of the challenges? What worked well? As a development platform, Second Life is an excellent tool. It works well for archiving drawings, ideas, storyboards, and movement directions. Of course, if you write about hackers and digital access, you’re bound to get hacked and “griefed” (the Second Life term for virtual harassment). As a networking device, it is clever and very sticky; it has tremendous potential as our computers and bandwidth catch up with the technology. Some of our primary mentors and advisors are unable to run Second Life smoothly on their primary work computers due to software and hardware restrictions, so we are not yet able to integrate them with our virtual-development process.How much time and money did you spend? To date we have spent less than $20 in Second Life. Our goal is to keep this project as sustainable as possible while providing financial stipends for the volunteer artists who have been working on this project for the last year. Amoration is a young 501(c)3 sponsored by the International Humanities Center; our staff has been working as volunteers for our arts education endeavors since 2004. We have approximately two dozen AMO Advisors who have given time and talent to help this project grow.How did you explain the project to organizational leaders or constituents? As an independent studio, we hold true to our organizational mission. We seek partners and projects that enhance a better world vision and we have made many new friends through the ManorMeta experiments.What are the benefits to your organization? The largest benefit to our organization is the interactivity, feedback, collaboration, and creative capital that we have exchanged in fun and captivating ways. There is so much potential as we build and bridge these new frontiers for kids around the world.What advice would you give to other nonprofits who might be interested? Write to us now at inkenzo@gmail.com We have found many tremendous pieces in this puzzle and we’d like to hear how you think they should fit together. If you have helpful leads for product and production partners for AMO Studio, please drop a line or introduce yourself in-world to In Kenzo, Common Cure, or any avatar from the ManorMeta group. We’ve been meeting tons of actors, stunt leads, musicians, and other talent and our team for this project is growing every week. We consider this to be a family and we invite people who want to create a culture of conscious compassion to tell us what you love to do.Copyright: CompuMentorSource: http://www.techsoup.org/learningcenter/internet/page5902.cfm?cg=searchterms&sg=second%20lifelast_img read more

Listening To the Bad and Using It for Good

first_imgOne of the great things about social technology is that anyone can have a platform for promoting their view of the world – via blog, comments on another person’s blog, Facebook page, Twitter, etc. That means that sooner or later, people are going to talk about your organization or cause online. That can feel great, if they love you; or it can feel bad, if they say stuff that’s not so nice. But I think the not-nice stuff is even more valuable sometimes, especially when it relates to our communications and customer/donor service. It’s good to know when people aren’t happy, because it can help us do a better job serving them by solving problems we may have been unaware about.Tactical Philanthropy blog asked me my philosophy on this topic after GiveWell blog had some not-so-nice things to say about Network for Good, which I replied to and discussed before eventually settling the matter. I thought I’d share what I said:Good marketing is about listening to the audience, acknowledging their perspective and having a conversation based on that perspective. A good marketing relationship is like any other relationship – it’s based in listening and conversation, and not simply monologue. Now everyone – including donors – has the tools to talk to the world, and that means nonprofits have the opportunity to listen, and sometimes, to start a conversation. I consider the Internet one big focus group – a place to see what donors, nonprofits and others are saying and doing, and a means to engage those audiences in conversations about what they care about. Donors’ blogs are incredibly useful – they are audience research, a feedback loop, a sounding board and a place to start a relationship – all rolled into one.That’s all really easy to say, but hard – even painful – to experience. Blogs allow people the freedom to talk about your issue or organization in their own words, and that means a loss of message control, which can be difficult to embrace. Sometimes what people say online is not especially nice or constructive, or it may not be based in a thorough understanding of any issue. It can be unpleasant – and sometimes, I think it’s best not to respond if what you read is a cheap-shot from someone not very invested in the issue at hand. I’ve stayed out of some conversations for that reason. But often, what a comment or post online may lack in warmth, it more than makes up for in authenticity and passion, and, however much it hurts to read it (and it hurts, especially if you believe in what you do), it’s very useful to know what people are honestly thinking. Those honest thinkers are worth listening to and learning from, and speaking with.In the case of GiveWell, it was very important to know people don’t have a good understanding of our fees, and why. Obviously, we should do a better job explaining them, and we will. I stand by our fees and believe they are incredibly fair considering all that we offer nonprofits, but if folks think they are not worth it, then I need to listen to that opinion – and learn from it, then do a better job as a communicator going forward.If I were working in marketing at United Airlines, I’d spend more time reading http://www.untied.com/and thinking about how to improve my company than I would on creating new ad campaigns.We have a serious problem in our sector right now – so bad, we might end up with an untied.com of our own. Most donors stop giving to charity because of dissatisfaction with how they were treated by the charity rather than personal constraints like financial problems. Too much mail, no thank-you acknowledgements, and little information on how their money was spent. If they are that mad, we had better listen-and learn.last_img read more

Creating Compelling Experiences of Persuasion

first_imgThis seminar examines ways – when creating experiences, events or media designed to get our message across and raise funds – in which we can avoid distraction of the audience while delivering our message. In addition, we will lay out certain methods that can be applied to all forms of communication of any scope for agencies of any size or mission.The discussion will explore practical applications of:• Exploration of Assumption• Circumventing Preconception• Comfortable Disorientation• Successive Revelation, and• Subliminal EngagementAbout Our SpeakerKile Ozier has built messaging experience for over 25 years across myriad contexts; from theme parks to academic institutions and non-profit agencies. In academia, he has created campaigns totaling over $3 billion for such institutions as Stanford University, Harvard Law School, Johns Hopkins University and more. Founder of one of the most respected AIDS funding organizations in the US, San Francisco’s Academy of Friends, Ozier has been cited for the quality and efficacy of the experiences he creates by a disparate spectrum of clients, from the United States Navy to the Themed Entertainment Association. He is also a great cook.last_img read more

The Kiwi’s Fleeting Flight

first_imgKiwi, which can be seen on YouTube right here, is one of the most popular videos of the last year, with more than 12 million views to date. Here’s a write-up of it:There are several powerful messages behind Kiwi, but mainly, it makes you think: no matter how absurd and seemingly out of reach your dreams are, what’s stopping you from achieving them?… Some people have described how Kiwi “sticks in your subconscious.” I know that whenever I feel sad, I’m going to close my eyes, visualize the thing that’s in my way or keeping me down, and tilt my head to the side to see the happy side of it.Sentimental, maybe even saccharine, but true. Limitations may not look like limitations if you shift your perspective and invest great effort. And, fortunately, this doesn’t always have to mean fleeting joy with a crashing end.last_img read more

Kiva in Second Life: Interview With Official SL Volunteers

first_imgKiva.org, a micro-finance organization, has funded nearly 17,0000 loans to entrepreneurs in developing countries and last week crossed the $11 million rank. Kiva.org has already had a very big year, funding about $9 million worth of loans so far, and having been featured in the mainstream media including the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Oprah and on ABC News.  With the assistance of dedicated volunteers, Kiva also maintains a presence on different social networking sites and has recently established a presence on Second Life through the Techsoup Nonprofits Commons Project.I discovered this when I clicked on Skeeboo Tammas’s profile while chatting with him in Second Life.   His profile said.Do good at Kiva.org! For $25, you can help fund a small loan to someone in need in a developing country. Kiva is not a charity. You get repaid and e-mail updates as the business succeeds! From there you can withdraw your funds or lend it back out. You can also donate Lindens to one of our Fundraisers, or drop it into the donation box at our virtual office here on Second Life. Click on the Picks tab above to teleport there! For more information about this amazing social lending network, visit Kiva.orgThat’s only one method they use to help educate Second Life users about Kiva’s work.Skeeboo Tammas (or Joe Alamo in real life), a volunteer who also runs KivaFriends.org, Kiva’s MySpace page, their Change.org profile and created the kiva.org browser bar.  that the staff does not have time to manage.Julles Boucher or (Julia Bailey, PhD) serves as kiva.org’s Second Life Coordinator on a volunteer basis.   She entered Second Life because of her relationship with kiva.org, but has purchased land and operates a shop called Garb the World.  She is scientist in real life and a self-described philanthropist who has invested $5,000 plus in kiva.org.   She is interested in technology and is an owner of an Internet-based business.I sat down with to learn more about their efforts on Kiva’s behalf in the virtual world.What is kiva.org doing in SL?Expanding marketing and awareness. We had an office a while back that someone donated but it disappeared, so we got a booth at 1st Life Aid, a few other places and we are just starting to set up a presence with the Nonprofit Commons Project. We think it is a good idea to be located with other nonprofits.Why do you think Second Life  is important for nonprofits – particularly fundraising?Second Life is a good way to disseminate information.  There is a large audience and it has been very helpful for other volunteers to work on kiva.org projects in here.  For example, one morning I worked from my home in California with Joe in NY and a volunteer in Belgium in setting up an information booth. We also had help from the preson who runs the booth and who is in South Africa.  It’s exciting to meet other people in world who care about kiva.org and work together.What are your goals for having a presence in SL with an office?Exposing the Kiva organization to new people in this interesting digital world and raising money to fund loans.  The strategy is kind of loose at the moment for us as we feel our way around this world.  We’ve set up a booth and got 15 loans (at $25 each), but donations really started pouring in when wwe got the first Life Aid booth.  Mostly we’re attending events and doing virtual guerrilla marketing.  There is another group that has raised $300 USD for Kikiva on Second Life and we also work with them. Given your experience with managing kiva.org’s presence in other social networking sites like myspace, how do virtual worlds compare in terms of the ROI?Second Life is 3-D and very interesting in things can be done in terms of virtual marketing. It can go beyond a standard web page and we’re taking advantage of that.  I think it’s been very good. Kiva has had it’s biggest year ever and our digital marketing has had a big role in that. Maybe not as big as Oprah, but still …What advice would you give to nonprofits just starting off in second life?Start a team to figure things out, invite your volunteers/donors to help and empower them as the Official Second Life volunteer, look for gamers who are already familiar with these virtual worlds.  Attend lots of meetings and talk to people and ask questions and get help.  There are lots of people in Second Life who want to help and there are many users here hanging out who would love to volunteer for a non-profit.Source: http://beth.typepad.com/beths_blog/2007/09/kiva-in-second-.htmllast_img read more

Make it Easy for Online Readers to Spread the Word

first_imgCalvin College’s release on its Sushi Theatre is a great example. Note the prompt to Share the Story, and the easy-to-use links to do so. Also, as higher ed marketing guru Bob Johnson points out, “the topic of the press release, ‘Sushi Theatre’ is included in the title tag for the page, making it more likely that a search engine ‘spyders’ will find and index it. The keyword in the title tag is then repeated in the major text heading (the headline in this case) on the page, and again early in the text itself.”Source: http://www.gettingattention.org/my_weblog/2007/03/make_it_easy_fo.htmlAbout the AuthorNancy E. Schwartz helps nonprofits succeed through effective marketing and communications. As President of Nancy Schwartz & Company (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/), Nancy and her team provide marketing planning and implementation services to organizations as varied as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Center for Asian American Media, and Wake County (NC) Health Services.Subscribe to her free e-newsletter “Getting Attention”, (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/getting_attention.html) and read her blog at http://www.gettingattention.org/ for more insights, ideas and great tips on attracting the attention your organization deserves.NOTE: You’re welcome to “reprint” this article online as long as it remains complete and unaltered (including the copyright and “about the author” info at the end), and you send a copy of your reprint. Nothing’s more powerful than having your audiences spread the word about your program, organization or new leadership. Such “viral marketing” is far more powerful than your organization telling its own story as friends tend to listen to friends, and believe what they say. To encourage viral marketing, make it as easy as possible for your audiences to spread the word. Here are two great ways to do so:1. Include a ‘forward to a friend’ link in your e-news and advocacy campaigns.2. Enable your audiences to spread the word more broadly, via social networking tools. Here’s how:Crafted to double as direct communications with your target audiences. They have to be engaging, succinct and formatted for easy digestion (lots of bullets, white space and short paragraphs).Integrate key tools to link to spokesperson bio and contact info, related resources and more. They’ll make a world of difference.Feature the single keyword for the release in the page title tag, the primary content heading (in your list of releases, or in your site) and the text at the top of the release (ideally in the first sentence of the first paragraph).One-click buttons to Share the Story (more engaging than Forward to a Friend):Add the site to reader’s bookmarks via DeliciousRate the site via DIGG.last_img read more

Media Habits of 12-24 Year-Olds vs. 25-54 Year-Olds — Key to Shaping Your Nonprofit Marketing Agenda

first_imgCare GREATLY about sources of news and information onlineNurture your brand — it’s vital for these folks Like mobile for voice (and a few for data) but do not see their world on mobile phonesI think this is going to change very soon, pay close attention to this factor Source: http://www.gettingattention.org/my_weblog/2007/10/media-habits-of.htmlAbout the AuthorNancy E. Schwartz helps nonprofits succeed through effective marketing and communications. As President of Nancy Schwartz & Company (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/), Nancy and her team provide marketing planning and implementation services to organizations as varied as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Center for Asian American Media, and Wake County (NC) Health Services.Subscribe to her free e-newsletter “Getting Attention”, (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/getting_attention.html) and read her blog at http://www.gettingattention.org/ for more insights, ideas and great tips on attracting the attention your organization deserves.NOTE: You’re welcome to “reprint” this article online as long as it remains complete and unaltered (including the copyright and “about the author” info at the end), and you send a copy of your reprint. For first time willing (2005) to pay for digital content-never beforeInventory your information assets and think about options for distribution Will never own a land-line phoneWill not watch television on someone else’s schedule much longer, and much less interested in TVTV ads won’t work, unless they’re part of the show (how about cause placement?) Use IM. Think email is for their parentsLife of a 25-54Still read offline newspapers and magazinesCast your op-eds to this group, boomers and seniors Little interest in the source of information and most information aggregatedEverything will move to mobileMore than advocacy and fundraising alerts, and make it interactive please Aggregate information online and use RSS (though few know the term)Community important for tasks, much less so for socializingTrust experts on factual information but rely heavily on reviews of peers on hotels, electronics, etcStart to use social networking with these folks, they’re on the path of increased reliance on audience-generated content I recently read the 2007 Digital Future Report from the USC Annenberg School’s Center for the Digital Future, and am still digesting. Take some time to dig into the summary of findings that’ll help you shape your communications choices to today’s (and tomorrow’s) digital habits.Here’s are some crucial takes on habits of those 12 to 24–juxtaposed with those of audiences 25 to 54–and how they’ll impact your nonprofit marketing:Audiences 12-24Will never read a newspaper but attracted to some magazinesSo op-eds don’t reach them, at least in print Heavy into email Trust unknown peers more than experts/community at the center of Internet experience/want to be heard (user generated)Stop ignoring social networkinglast_img read more

Make Your Messages Stick – With Made to Stick

first_imgSource: http://www.gettingattention.org/my_weblog/2007/01/make_your_messa.htmlAbout the AuthorNancy E. Schwartz helps nonprofits succeed through effective marketing and communications. As President of Nancy Schwartz & Company (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/), Nancy and her team provide marketing planning and implementation services to organizations as varied as the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Center for Asian American Media, and Wake County (NC) Health Services.Subscribe to her free e-newsletter “Getting Attention”, (http://www.nancyschwartz.com/getting_attention.html) and read her blog at http://www.gettingattention.org/ for more insights, ideas and great tips on attracting the attention your organization deserves.NOTE: You’re welcome to “reprint” this article online as long as it remains complete and unaltered (including the copyright and “about the author” info at the end), and you send a copy of your reprint. When I read Malcolm Gladwell’s The Tipping Point, I quickly became a convert. I learned to watch for, and value, stickiness. But it was harder to understand how to make my nonprofit client’s ideas and messages stick.Now, brothers Chip and Dan Heath, fill in the blanks with their guide, Made to Stick. For the Heaths, stickiness is all about “ensuring your ideas are understood and remembered, and have a lasting impact – they change your audience’s opinions or behavior“.Dan, a consultant at Duke, and his brother Chip, a professor at Stanford Business School, found that messages of all kinds — from the infamous “organ theft ring” hoax and a coach’s lessons on sportsmanship to a product vision statement from Sony — draw their power from the same six principles of stickiness:Simple — Hone in on the essence of your subject, stripping out the extra. Think core and compact, like a proverb.Unexpected — Break a pattern or routine to get attention. Use unexpected stories, language, channels. Highlight a gap in knowledge. Create mystery with a teaser.Concrete — Abstraction is hard to digest, and to retain. Explain your idea or message in concrete terms to help people understand (with less room for interpretation) and remember.Credible — Help audiences believe. Cite authorities, details and statistics.Emotional — Make people care. Appeal to self-interest. Introduce audiences to others they can relate to, link your messages to what they already care about and their aspirations. The Times Neediest Cases Fund excels here, crafting compelling profiles supported by photos to generate a great deal of empathy, interest and donations among Times readers. I’ve been reading those profiles since I was a kid, and giving every year.Story(telling) — A story brings ideas to life, placing them in a lifelike framework we can relate to, and remember. The Neediest Cases Fund excels at telling powerful stories. Stories are frequently unexpected, concrete, emotional and credible. The best ones are simple enough to be remembered and re-told.Download Made to Stick for Social Enterprise for a printable guide on these six sticky elements: Beware the Curse of Knowledge.Our knowledge is often a barrier to clear messages, because we can’t imagine (and sometimes don’t try) the perspective of someone who doesn’t know it. The more we know about a subject, the less we’re able to shape it into a message that will stick, but the Heaths offer strategies for defeating the Curse of Knowledge and other roadblocks to sticky success.Made to Stick is the rare business book that’s well-written and absolutely entertaining. And Chip and Dan walk the walk, building their book on a foundation of compelling anecdotes and stories. Made to Stick is a must read for anyone striving to craft messages that are memorable and lasting.last_img read more

Involving Your Audience—Upstream!

first_imgGood marketers understand the values of your audience, not your own, should shape how you communicate.  So I want to call your attention to someone who is letting their audience shape their creative work, turning their web redesign into a conversation with constituents. American Rivers is truly moving audience feedback upstream as the organization rethinks americanrivers.org, nationalrivercleanup.org, and healthyrivers.org.First, check out their blog, which shows just how transparent and collaborative their redesign is.  Also take a look at their Flickr contest, where they are asking river-lovers to upload their own photos.My Network for Good colleague Stacie Mann  knows the clever guy behind this work and the blog, Chas Offutt, and asked him how goes the marketing conversation that he’s started.  Here are his responses:1) Was there any pushback within organization about being so transparent? Nothing to date, but I’m not exactly sure how many people are aware of the blog. I’ve been rolling it out on an individual basis to generate feedback, greater review before I make a larger outward push. These small steps have worked out well as I’ve made a quite a few changes over the first 5 weeks that have greatly impacted the direction of my efforts. I’ve gotten some excellent feedback from co-workers, friends, and counterparts within the online advocacy community.2) What results are you seeing with blogging?Well, I’m seeing growth in traffic, comments, and general participation (Crazy Egg’s heat map is pretty cool, which, by the way, that idea came from a visitor). And, internally, I’m getting a lot of support from folks who appreciate being involved in the process. Last month, I held a Web 2.0 Introduction that went over really well. It would be great to have del.icio.us, Flickr, and RSS on our site, but what good would it be if the staff had no idea what it means and more importantly, how it can benefit their work. I feel the blog, as well as my work within the organization, should contain an education (i.e. testing) component – hence some of the “blog bling”. The success of our efforts online will not be because of me or my team, but the organization as a whole.3) What kinds of things surprised you? Good or bad… Aside from folks actually reading it, I’ve been a little surprised with the number of paths that I’ve been able to pursue as a result of this online dialogue – I seem to be referred to some cool new thing everyday (e.g. Vizu from Katya). I know I’m not the first to experience these online changes and one reason I wanted to do start this blog was to learn more about what’s happening in my field and reach out to those who have gone, going, or thinking about going through a website redesign.  Down the road, I’d love to see everyone in the organization blogging (but not like PhilTube) about their work – that would be awesome.last_img read more

Help! My Boss Hates Marketing!

first_img“Help! My boss hates marketing!” is one of the most common comments I get from people who speak to me after my presentations. Here are some quick answers to: “How do I get my boss/board/team to value/fund/stop hating marketing?”Simply stated, you don’t. Instead, you do the following six things.1. Stop calling it marketing. Call it something else.Instead of trying to convince your boss, board or team to love marketing, try showing them what THEY care about and how you can make that happen.2. Show how your “initiative” meets their agenda. Don’t position your agenda as a marketing campaign; frame it as your initiative to support your boss’s goals, in your boss’s language. Demonstrate how you are going to help make that fundraising goal, audience behavior change or front-page newspaper story happen.3. Make it about the audience.A good way to depersonalize different visions for “marketing” is to make it about your audience’s preferences rather than a philosophical tug of war between you and said boss. A little audience research is great fodder for advancing your agenda.4. Report every wee step of progress.Every single time anything good happens, be sure the boss knows it. Identify some early, likely wins toward your boss’s goals and report victories.5. Give your boss credit and put him or her in the spotlight. When good things happen, give credit to your boss. Create a dashboard that shows progress against your boss’s goals and let your boss show that progress to the board. Your boss will like you for it. If you pitched your organization’s story in a completely new, marketing-savvy way to reporters and that yielded your boss’s photo in the paper, all the better.6. Seek forgiveness, not permission. If all else fails, just do what you want to do anyway, quietly, and tell your boss about it when something good happens.last_img read more

Sample Online Fundraising Plan

first_imgWe’ll maximize our giving opportunities on the site and give them high visibility on our home page and other pages, especially our most visited pages and those pages that tend to evoke strong emotions (animal pages). This is a sample plan for an imaginary local animal rescue organization called Save the Animals (STA) which is trying to take their outreach efforts online to become well known in the community. While the specifics of your online fundraising plan will be unique for your organization, the overarching themes will likely be similar. This intensive plan calls for a relatively high budget but you will likely want or need to dedicate much less.The goals of this online fundraising plan are to:Open an online channel of communication with direct mail donors who want it.Acquire new online donors.Cultivate and re-solicit existing and new online donors.The key to acquiring new online donors will be developing partnerships to drive traffic to our site, building a large e-mail list for prospecting, and making our site even more successful in converting visitors into donors. In addition, we’ll expand the opportunities for raising money elsewhere online. At the same time, we will use our direct mail (and telephone) program to offer online communications to those donors and to integrate online communication with other fundraising communications.1. WebsiteOur site should be a major tool in engaging and interacting with new and existing donors, while still meeting the needs of our various other constituencies- people seeking to adopt, kids, animal lovers, etc. Some of our donors also probably visit our site now and then, so it needs to demonstrate to them that they’ve invested wisely. They should see offline fundraising themes reflected on the site, new content, things to do, compelling features, etc. Many new people will also visit our site simply to look at the animals, without any intention of adopting. We’ll need online mechanisms to engage those people and to turn them into donors. Here’s what we’ll do to make that happen.We’ll re-develop our site to improve its look and feel and increase its functionality. We’ll focus on finding vendors and/or application service providers (ASPs) who offer easy-maintenance solutions to reduce the burden on staff. Then, we’ll work to make our site more appealing to our various constituencies with interactivity (surveys, contests), news, compelling appeals, easy event sign-ups, and new features like e-cards. On an ongoing basis, we’ll monitor opportunities for promoting STA’s work online in the context of animal-related news and our many events.2. E-mail marketingWe’ll develop an e-mail outreach program for communicating regularly with donors and prospects. The program will initially include a monthly e-newsletter with donor and non-donor versions and occasional action or event alerts. Eventually, we’ll build in targeted e-mail messages for people with expressed interests in certain subjects like a no-kill policy, dogs, feral cat care, etc., and deliver e-mail renewals for existing online donors; and solicitations and special appeals for both existing donors and prospects. As our e-mail list grows, we’ll test ways to use email to boost response to direct mail, such as:– Sending a pre-mail e-mail that tells people that they’ll be receiving an important letter in the mail or invite people to respond– Sending a post-mail e-mail that says “We hope you received our recent letter. If you haven’t had a chance to give yet, please give online today. It’s fast, easy, and efficient.”We’ll promote some online services in our direct mail – especially our store during the holidays. Increasing our visibility on our offline corporate partners’ Web sites through links, banners, and special campaigns. We’ll develop and implement strategies for building our e-mail list. In addition to offering simple email sign-ups on our site, we’ll design creative ways to build our prospect e-mail list through incentives, such as offering a chance to win a gift certificate to a local pet store for people who subscribe to our e-newsletter.3. Increasing site trafficWith a compelling website and technology in place to manage content and donor relationships, we’ll develop campaigns to drive traffic to our site. We’ll work to improve our search engine and directory rankings and links, create and run campaigns on our site and elsewhere, and develop corporate partnerships and sponsorships to drive traffic to our site. Strategies will include:Finding an appealing, easy-to-remember URL We will develop a persistent program for gradually gathering the e-mail addresses of direct mail donors who want to add e-mail to their communications with us. We will test asks in the direct mail (P.S., buck slip, reply device, etc.) and track response to finding the most effective and least expensive ways to gather e-mail addresses without depressing gift response. We’ll send test and track communications and re-solicitations to these donors.6. Tracking, benchmarking, reportingWe’ll evaluate the e-mail messaging program by tracking the number of recipients that are converted into new donors and the number of gifts and renewals received from existing donors in direct response to an e-mail solicitation. We’ll also carefully monitor the overall giving levels of donors receiving the e-news versus donors not receiving the e-news to evaluate the e-news as a cultivation tool. Promoting our fundraising campaigns on media sites. We’ll develop graphics and try to place them free on national, regional and local media sites.center_img We’ll send a cultivation mailer to our lapsed donors inviting them to visit our Web site. We can direct them to a special page on our website that makes an appeal for why they should make another gift. Promoting our site as a no-kill information center by disseminating (free) content, tips, facts and interactive devices to other sites with links back to our site. The spring appeal will be combined with a no-kill (or other issues) awareness campaign with special web pages and a strong tell-a-friend element. While it will have a fundraising element, the focus of this campaign will be to build our online reputation and our e-mail list.5. Integration with Direct MailWe’ll use traditional communications channels to build our donor e-mail list and promote our website. Promoting our events online through event listing services like CitySearch.com, local media listings, and others. Maximizing our search engine rankings by improving our meta tags, buying some keywords, and paying for increased rankings at some sites.4. Special CampaignsWe’ll run a few targeted online campaigns throughout the year: one in December, and one in the spring.The December campaign will have a holiday focus with special holiday giving opportunities (gift memberships, with the calendar as one of its features) and also drive traffic to our store. We’ll evaluate our site traffic to determine which content is most appealing and increase the visibility of that content, as well as tie in giving opportunities.7. BudgetExpenses depend on many choices, but might include:Website redevelopment (including back-end functionality) $15,000-$100,000E-mail messaging system set-up fee $250-$500 one timeWebsite maintenance $500-$2,000 monthlyE-mail messaging on-going fees up to $250 monthlyBanner ad development $5,000 annuallyOnline campaigns $10,000-$50,000 eachConsultant – ongoing monthly retainer $3,500 monthly– Consultation on website development– Development of online partnerships– Production and management of monthly e-news and up to one stand-alone solicitation to donors and non-donors– E-mail messaging system management, including monthly data imports/exports to integrate with offline database– Integration with direct mail– Copywriting for appeals for the sitelast_img read more

Organizing Your Nonprofit Marketing Plan

first_imgA properly organized nonprofit marketing plan supports itself like a pyramid. For each goal, there are objectives; every objective has strategies; and each strategy has tactics.However, all too often the terms goal, objective, strategy and tactic are used as interchangeable ways of saying the same thing. Plainly put, they are not – and the resulting lack of precision can be problematic.GoalsA goal is a “statement of being” for the plan. While the completion of the goal signifies the end of your plan, the objectives, strategies and tactics are the means to that end.ObjectivesCompared to the goal, objectives are more focused and specific, and the best-formulated objectives express results as measurable outcomes. Think in terms of the awareness, attitude or action that you hope to invoke. Often there are multiple objectives in support of a single goal. Meaningful objectives start with action verbs and have four parts. They:Identify a specific audience being addressed,State a measurable outcome,Set an attainment level, andSet a timeframe.StrategiesStrategies are where the rubber meets the road. Rarely is one strategy enough to fully accomplish an objective. Likewise, it is not unusual for a single strategy to serve multiple objectives.TacticsTactics are the specific tools you use to implement your strategies. News releases, brochures, media pitches, e-newsletters, blogs, Web sites, surveys, focus groups, and videos are just a few examples that spring to mind. It is the truly creative part of the plan’s authors to decide exactly which tactics are needed to successfully implement the chosen strategies.In ClosingA good marketing plan is interlinked from top to bottom. Without good tactics, a strategy will not successfully complete an objective, rendering the success of a goal limited.A true marketing plan forces the authors to employ the right mix of experience with critical thinking. With this understanding of the key differences between goals, objectives, strategies and tactics, the end result is a plan that can be executed successfully.(Source: Arketti Group)last_img read more

What Every Smart Non Profit Needs To Know About Web 2.0

first_imgWhat sort of outreach are you doing? How do you find new donors, new members, new volunteers? Something big is happening online, it’s free, it’s fast and more and more non-profits are figuring out how to use it.How much did your organization spend on direct mail last year? How many press releases did you issue? How many galas, walkathons, donor dinners and community events did you sponsor? All designed to get the word out. All produced, at great expense, to help you tell the world about the great work you’re doing.The new internet changes the rules. You may have heard the rumblings about Web 2.0. About Google spending 1.6 billion dollars to buy YouTube.com, or about all the teenagers spending way too much time at MySpace. Surely there isn’t room for your organization in this revolution! Or, if there is, no doubt it is going to take you a lot of time, planning and money…The good news is that the community-centric model of Web 2.0 is custom-made for organizations that do good work. No ticket required; no technology needed. The very same tools that have made it easy for a 14-year-old guitar player from Japan to become world famous make it easy for you to reach a larger audience than ever before.It’s a whole new Internet. Here are the six free things you can do right now to figure it out.1) Put yourself on YouTube.It is now the 8th most popular website on the Internet. And you can be there for free. Search YouTube for “ASPCA” to see how.2) Get found on Technorati.Technorati tracks blog posts and site changes. Registering your URL takes only a few minutes.3) Measure your traffic. Free.Measure your marketing campaigns. Google provides critical information about where your traffic is coming from and how people are navigating through your pages.4) Tap the blogs.Run a search on technorati.com or feedster.com to determine which bloggers are talking about you and your area. Then cultivate relationships with them.5) Donations with Squidoo.The fastest-growing fundraising co-op on the Web helps nonprofits raise money and drive traffic, by letting people create easy-to-build web pages on any topic.6) Digg it!Digg.com lets people vote on the news and web pages that are important to them, bringing the best stuff to the top. This is a free way to gets lots of traffic to your site.Source: http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2006/12/free_onepager_f.htmllast_img read more

Online Fundraising Tactics – What Works?

first_imgMatch.58 percent$59 Standalone.31 percent$55 When it comes to online fundraising, there is no “one size fits all” magic formula to inspire list members to give. However, some tactics do work better than others.In an attempt to find out which strategies work best and when, we reviewed more than 180 fundraising appeals sent out over the course of the 2006 calendar year by nine prominent national non-profit organizations (see Study Participants for a full list). We explored everything from “double your money” matching gift opportunities to deadline-driven campaigns to goal-oriented asks. For the purposes of our analysis, we grouped the appeals we reviewed into one or more of the following four tactic categories:Multiple Appeal Series. Messages sent as part of a cohesive, multiple appeal campaign over the course of three weeks were compared to stand alone appeals that were not part of a larger series.Deadline-Driven. Stand alone or multiple appeal series that used a deadline to drive giving were compared to those without a deadline.Matching Gift. Stand alone or multiple appeal fundraising series that included a matching gift offer were compared to those without a matching gift element.Dollar Goal. Stand alone or multiple appeal series that focused on reaching a monetary goal were compared to those that did not make use of a dollar goal.However, many of the messages we reviewed fell into more than one of these categories — for example, a three-appeal matching gift series with a deadline of June 2nd and a goal of raising $25,000 would fall into all four categories. Because there are substantial variations in response rate, average gift, etc., among the organizations, we chose to evaluate these four tactics within each organization rather than compare the messages to each other. This led to a fairly small sample size, making it harder to draw definitive conclusions; however, our results did trend toward statistical significance in three of the four tactic categories.Multiple Appeal SeriesPerhaps the most striking finding was the difference between multiple appeal series (a fundraising campaign made up of two or more appeals) and single or “stand-alone” fundraising appeals. We found that the multiple fundraising appeal series tended to outperform one-time appeals, resulting in both a higher response rate and a higher average gift. Deadline Versus No Deadline Average Response RateAverage Gift Karen Matheson is the Manager of Quantitative Research and Analysis for M+R Strategic Services.Eve Fox is a vice president of the eCampaigns division of M+R Strategic Services.Copyright © 2007 M+R Strategic Services. All Rights Reserved. Series1.32 percent$99 No Match.34 percent$39 For more information on study methodology and statistical significance of results, please see Study Methodology, below. Multi-Appeal Versus Standalonecenter_img No Deadline$60 Matching GiftsDespite the fact that our small sample size prevents us from drawing any firm conclusions, the results of the analysis did trend towards significance. It appears that the idea of making a donation that will be doubled by another donor (or group of donors) is motivational to many online donors. A matching gift campaign also provides the perfect rationale to introduce a deadline and to send out multiple appeals, both good ways to boost returns. Matching Gift Versus No Matching Gift Average Response RateAverage Gift Dollar GoalsUnfortunately, the jury is still out on the effectiveness of including a dollar goal in a fundraising appeal. The results of our analysis were not large enough (again, possibly because of the small sample size) to be considered statistically significant. However, setting a dollar goal for a fundraising campaign does provide a solid rationale for setting a deadline to reach the goal and for sending multiple appeals leading up to the deadline — both tactics which are likely to increase response rates overall.ConclusionNo matter what your current fundraising strategies or goals are, we recommend that you continue to test different messaging hooks and tactics to find out which ones work best for your audience. A carefully crafted multiple appeal series could be used in conjunction with standalone messages, and might just increase your response rates and overall donations. Deadlines, matching gifts, and dollar goals are creative (and often effective) ways of raising money and engaging your email list members. Every organization has unique and specific needs, but the strategies described above are a useful place to start testing new approaches.Study ParticipantsDonorsChooseLeague of Conservation VotersNational Parks Conservation AssociationOxfam AmericaPlanned Parenthood Federation of AmericaPhil Angelides’ Campaign for Governor of CaliforniaPublic CampaignSave Darfur CoalitionThe Wilderness SocietyStudy MethodologyWe reviewed more than 180 fundraising appeals sent out by the nine national nonprofit organizations listed above between January and December of 2006. We examined appeals in four categories: appeal versus series, deadline-driven versus no deadline, matching gift versus no match, and dollar goal versus no goal. As explained above, every fundraising appeal was categorized by whether it was a member of each appeal category; this allowed for messages to belong to none of these categories or all of these categories.Because differences among the organizations’ message tone and donor databases were difficult to control for, we compared messages by fundraising tactic within organizations. One downside to using this “paired samples” data was that it kept our sample size small, which reduced our ability to generalize the results to all organizations.Given that the sample size was so small, it is encouraging to see some statistically significant (at the .05 level) results in the data we presented. Our results did trend toward statistical significance in three of the four tactics investigated. “Statistical significance” means that the differences we found within the paired samples were unlikely to be the result of chance variations. For more information about statistical significance, check see Statsoft’s article Elementary Concepts in Statistics.About the Authors: Deadline-Driven Appeals and SeriesThe results of our analysis showed that appeals and series that included a deadline by which gifts must be made tended to be more effective than open-ended appeals without specific deadlines. Although the difference between average gifts was significant, the difference between the response rates was not statistically significant (so we have not included it here).Although further analysis (ideally with a larger sample size) is warranted, it appears that deadlines, whether tiered to some real-life event or introduced without explanation, do tend to boost the returns on a fundraising appeal or campaign. Deadline$93 Average Giftlast_img read more

Review of Recent Online Communications Benchmarks Studies

first_imgAs more and more organizations turn to the Internet to enhance and expand their fundraising, advocacy and communications work, a number of key questions have arisen, including:How does our online program compare to other programs?What are reasonable goals for list growth, response rates, churn rates, etc?How can we measure the success of our online work?Until very recently, little data existed with which to answer these questions. However, in the past year, several studies have aimed to establish the benchmarks needed to evaluate the performance of nonprofits’ online communications, advocacy, fundraising, and email messaging programs.We recently reviewed these studies: the eNonprofit Benchmarks Study, the Online Marketing (eCRM) Nonprofit Benchmark Index TM Study, and the donorCentricsTM Internet Giving Benchmarking Analysis, and we have provided a brief summary below of the main findings on which all three studies agree.SHARED FINDINGS The three recent benchmarks studies capture online program metrics from a variety of nonprofits that focus on a multitude of issue areas. Though the data differs somewhat among the studies, one point is perfectly clear: the Internet is the place for nonprofits to invest! 1. Online Giving Is On The Rise All three studies found that the amount of money raised online per organization is rapidly increasing. Though the statistics vary fairly widely, the studies reflect the general trend of growth in nonprofit online fundraising programs.The Online Marketing (eCRM) Nonprofit Benchmark IndexTM reports a growth rate of 27 % in median dollars raised from 2005 to 2006.The eNonprofit Benchmarks Study reports a 40 % growth in average amount raised from the year 2003-2004 to the year 2004-2005.The donorCentrics Analysis reports that the median cumulative growth in online donors amongst its study participants has been 101% over the past three years.2. Rapid Response Pays Both the eNonprofit Benchmarks Study and the donorCentrics Analysis note significant spikes in online donations due to giving after the Asian tsunami and Hurricane Katrina. All three studies emphasize the importance of nonprofits’ quick response to a natural disaster or other breaking news.3. Email Lists Are Growing The eNonprofit Benchmarks Study and the eCRM Nonprofit Benchmarks IndexTM both report growth in email list sizes. The former reports an average growth of 73% across the 15 study partners from September 2004 to September of 2005. The latter reports a median growth rate of 47% from July 2005 to June 2006. In addition, the Index Study reports that organizations with smaller lists (under 50,000) grew twice as fast as those with larger lists.4. Bigger Lists = More Money & More Actions The eNonprofit Benchmarks Study illustrates that email list size is directly proportional to the number of advocacy actions and letters generated. Simply put, the bigger the email list, the larger the number of advocacy actions generated.Likewise, the eCRM Nonprofit Benchmarks IndexTM split funds raised online by email list size to show the difference in amount raised by various file sizes and the trend of larger email lists raising more money holds true.5. Fundraising Messaging Metrics Holding Steady Both the eNonprofit Benchmarks Study and the eCRM Nonprofit Benchmark IndexTM calculated open, click through, response, and conversion rates on fundraising messaging from their data. These metrics have stayed consistent over the last two years.ADDITIONAL INTERESTING FINDINGS 1. Online Donors Versus Offline Donors The 2006 donorCentricsTM Internet Giving Benchmarking Analysis by DonorDigital and Target Analysis Group reviewed data from 12 nonprofit organizations to compare online giving with offline giving. The key takeaways include:Online donors tend to be much younger and to have higher incomes than direct mail donors.The distribution of online donors is more evenly spread over age ranges while direct mail donors are heavily concentrated in the 65-and-older age group.Online donors tend to join at higher giving levels, give larger gifts, and have higher lifetime giving than offline donors.Only 4% of newly acquired online donors also gave direct mail gifts in their first year on the list, but 46% of them gave direct mail gifts in their renewal year.Multiple-channel donors have higher revenue per donor and higher retention rates than single-channel donors.Revenue for donors who gave online was 28% higher ($114 compared to $82) than donors who only gave offline.Donors acquired online tend to lapse at higher rates than donors acquired by mail. Some of this turnover may be attributed differences in cultivation strategies.2. Website Traffic and Site Visitor Registration Convio’s Online Marketing (eCRM) Nonprofit Benchmark IndexTM Study looked at website traffic and visitor registration across 16 client websites. The key points the study found include:The websites received an average of roughly 26,000 unique visitors per month.The groups had a median growth rate of 30 % in unique web visitors in the year studied.Groups with e-newsletters and member center registration had a median registration rate of 2.8 % per month.Recommendations for improving website sign up rates included consistently providing compelling content and incentives to register, optimizing the registration process, and providing multiple engagement opportunities.Source: http://www.mrss.com/last_img read more